Sweden

  • SHW 1

    Rising demand for solar heat in large buildings and industry

    By the end of 2017, the market for solar heating and cooling had grown by 472 GWth, which again made it the largest for solar energy in the world. The one for photovoltaic systems gained 402 GWp to become the second-largest, and 5 GWel was enough for...
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  • Map: lonelyplanet.com

    Energy efficiency funding in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    The Jugoslav Wars of the 1990s slowed down the rate of energy-related retrofits in the residential and public sectors of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Recently, however, the country has seen some improvement in the amount of funding available for clean heating technologies, such as solar thermal...
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  • Chart: Hamburg Institut

    How to identify suitable areas for SDH

    Though the availability of areas for large solar district heating plants remains a major point of contention, there are ways to expand the market. They include detailed local heat plans, the use of unconventional, e.g., polluted or contaminated, areas, and awareness raising among public and...
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  • Photo: Climate and Energy Fund

    Record participation at SDH 2018 in Graz

    The 5th International Solar District Heating Conference, which took place in Graz, Austria, in mid-April, brought together 350 experts from 33 countries. It had twice as many attendees as the previous one in Billund, Denmark, in 2016 and attracted representatives from several...
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  • Photo: Absolicon

    Parabolic trough collector production line shipped to China

    Absolicon, a Swedish supplier of concentrating solar thermal technology, has recently delivered its first production line to a Chinese company. The equipment to manufacture parabolic trough collectors, which the Swedish business developed in-house, arrived in China in mid-April. The line is...
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  • Chart: Sven Werner

    Sweden: Pioneer of solar district heating

    When it comes to district heating, Sweden has made the switch from fossil fuels to biomass and waste heat (see chart). As early as 2015, biomass provided 46 % of the energy in district heating networks across the country, followed by 24 % from waste incineration and 8 % from industrial...
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  • Photo: Riccardo Battisti

    Solar thermal and biomass – a winning solution for district heating

    Biomass may be cheap and carbon-neutral, but a solar upgrade of biomass-fired district heating could further improve efficiency and reduce local emissions. For example, solar heat helps avoid having to start up and shut down wood-chip boilers or operate them at partial load. It can even...
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  • Task 61

    Daylight and electric lighting: new research initiative

    The IEA Solar Heating & Cooling Programme has approved Task 61, a new research initiative concentrating on integrated daylight and electric lighting solutions. The task will tackle unresolved issues and challenges of a growing market which meets 19 % of the total electricity demand...
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  • NFOŚiGW

    Solar to replace coal in Polish district heating networks

    Zbigniew Kamieński, adviser to the president of NFOŚiGW’s board, has recently made some encouraging statements. During the conference Use of renewable energy sources and seasonal heat storage in district heating in Warsaw on 17 January, he said that the proposal of a new subsidy...
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  • Solar Is UK's Best District Heating Option

    Solar Is UK's Best District Heating Option

    The UK government has clear and ambitious plans to raise the share of district heating (DH) in total heat consumption. GBP (Pound Sterling) 320 million is said to be made available for increasing the number of households connected to DH from 220,000 to 8 million by 2030, or to 30 % of today...
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  • Embedded thumbnail for SHC 2017 / Maria Wall: Solar Energy in Urban Planning

    SHC 2017 / Maria Wall: Solar Energy in Urban Planning

    In ancient Rome, urban citizens had a "right to light" that was limiting the densification of cities to get sufficient daylight and also natural ventilation. With electric lighting and mechanical ventilation, this got forgotten. Maria Wall explains why the increasing use of solar energy and...

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