Guidebook for the Development of a Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action for Solar Water Heaters

Reflecting the changing balance in global greenhouse gas emissions, NAMAs embody the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. In addition to developed countries’ commitments to make quantitative reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, developing countries are invited to contribute with voluntary actions that are ‘nationally appropriate’ deviations from ‘business as usual’ emissions scenarios. Such deviations may be captured in low-carbon (or low-emission) development strategies, and then implemented as NAMAs

This guidebook provides an introduction to designing government-led interventions to scale up investment in solar water heating (SWH) markets, showing how these interventions can be packaged as Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS).

Reflecting the changing balance in global greenhouse gas emissions, NAMAs embody the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. In addition to developed countries’ commitments to make quantitative reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, developing countries are invited to contribute with voluntary actions that are ‘nationally appropriate’ deviations from ‘business as usual’ emissions scenarios. Such deviations may be captured in low-carbon (or low-emission) development strategies, and then implemented as NAMAs.

This guidebook provides an introduction to designing government-led interventions to scale up investment in solar water heating (SWH) markets, showing how these interventions can be packaged as Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS).

The guidebook is structured in four main sections:

  • An introduction to NAMAs, generic background for the NAMA concept, origin and founding principles, as well as current interpretations among international stakeholders and the UNFCCC Secretariat;
  • Structuring NAMAs for SWH technologies, specifics on how to develop a NAMA from a SWH strategy, using UNEP’s Market Readiness Analysis Tool to provide evidence and analysis to key stakeholders and potential financiers;
  • Measuring, reporting and verifying of NAMA impacts including emissions reductions and co-benefits;
  • Financing for NAMAs, ways in which SWH NAMAs could be financed. It introduces the ‘incremental costs’ approach as a means of quantifying budgets for ‘supported NAMAs’.

Author: UNEP DTU Partnership

Date of publication: 2014

Pages: 64

Download document here. This guidebook is also available in Arabic and Spanish

 

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