You are here

Residential

Dubai: No Solar Thermal System, No Building Permit

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 4, 2016
Four Seasons Hotel DubaiDubai’s solar thermal obligation has had a positive impact on demand for solar water heating systems across the emirate. Since March 2012, newbuilds with a single owner, such as hotels, workers’ dwellings, private villas, shopping malls and public buildings, have had to cover at least 75 % of their annual hot water requirements by solar energy, provided that enough roof space is available. Proprietors of swimming pools have had to install additional solar thermal systems with a capacity of 50 % or more of the total required for heating these pools (see the attached Dubai Municipality Circular No. 183 from 2011). “Consultancies, building owners and construction companies have since become increasingly aware of the opportunities of solar water heaters,” explained Jim Sebastian Parambil, Managing Director of Ecoval Trading, Dubai, UAE. His company, which specialises in heating and cooling solutions with solar thermal collectors and heat pumps, has been in the business for more than 14 years. The photo shows one of Ecoval’s 2014 systems, which consists of 200 Solahart BT collectors and was installed at the Four Seasons Resort Dubai at Jumeirah Beach.
Photo: Ecoval
 

California: San Francisco Passes First Mandate with Solar Thermal Option

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 14, 2016
LuminaltAfter Lancaster, Sebastopol and Santa Monica, San Francisco is now the fourth – and the largest – US American city to mandate the use of solar energy in residential and commercial newbuilds. It also has the first mandate in California which can be complied with by using either solar thermal or photovoltaics. The other three cities stipulated the installation of a PV generator at newly developed premises. The mandate in San Francisco aims at owners of new residential and non-residential buildings who apply for a building permit on or after 1 January 2017. The photo shows the typical multi-storey building structure and density of San Francisco. 
Photo: Luminalt
 

Lebanon: Municipalities of Tyre Discuss Solar Obligation Pilot Project

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 28, 2015
Lebanon workshopThe Lebanese Center for Energy Conservation (LCEC) has organised a consultation meeting with the Union of Tyre Municipalities (UOTM) to discuss the implementation of a solar ordinance in the south of Lebanon. The workshop took place in the Platinum Hotel in the city of Tyre on 9 May under the patronage of Abdel Mohsen El Husseini, President of the UOTM. This consultation meeting was a follow-up to a series of bilateral talks with individual municipalities to introduce and promote the implementation of a solar obligation at municipality level. With its 60 municipalities, the UOTM is committed to adopting a solar obligation in the framework of a pilot project. 
Photo: LCEC
 

Frontrunner in Solar Obligations in Africa

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 28, 2015
The government of the East-African country approved the so-called Energy (Solar Water Heating) Regulations 2012, which were gazetted on 25 May that year. The Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) is implementing a number of measures to support the implementation of the ordinance. 
Read news 1
Read news 2
 

Kenya: Financial Scheme Attached to Solar Obligation

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 28, 2015
Solimpexs AfricaKenya is the frontrunner in solar obligations in Africa. The government of the East-African country approved the so-called Energy (Solar Water Heating) Regulations 2012, which were gazetted on 25 May that year (see the attached PDF). The Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) confirmed that there “has been significant growth in solar thermal” since the solar obligation came into force. The financial institutions have also jumped on the solar bandwagon recently and are creating asset finance solutions to make solar water heating systems affordable. One of them is Housing Finance, a firm quoted on the Nairobi Stock Exchange. The company started the SolaPawa programme in March 2015 to focus “primarily on the provision of financing for solar water heating systems for both domestic and commercial entities,” Achieng Oluoch, Head of Marketing at Housing Finance, explains. “Our objective is to enable individuals and institutions to comply with this law in a convenient manner.”
Photo: Solimpexs Africa
 

Solar Water Heater Market Assessment in South-East Asia

Submitted by Amr Hai on April 16, 2015

This report provides the existing status of the Solar Water Heating (SWH) industry in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, The Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. The report contains an overview of different aspects of a country’s SWH market, such as the solar energy availability and applicability for water heating applications, the achieved or installed capacities, the supply chain mechanisms, investments in SWH technology and the existing supportive institutional and policy frameworks.

China: No Sales Permit without Solar

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 21, 2014
China mandatory lawsIn 2007, some provincial and city governments in China began to implement solar installation requirements. Since then, an increasing number of authorities at different administrative levels have made the installation of solar thermal systems mandatory in new-builds in the residential and public sector, for example, in universities, schools, hospitals and nursing homes. The documents which have led to the development of provincial and municipal solar water heater installation requirements were the 11th Five-Year Plan New Energy and Renewable Energy Development (2006-2010) and the Renewable Energy Law of China. Despite some past announcements, there have not yet been any solar building requirements at national level. 
Photo: Simon Goess
 

Hawaii: Results of Three Years of Solar Obligation

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 3, 2013

Since Act 204 “mandating” solar water heating systems on all new single-family dwellings came into force in January 2010, the number of new residential houses equipped with a solar water heater has risen to 75 % in Hawaii. This is the conclusion from the statistics published by Hawaiian distributor Inter-Island Solar Supply (IISS). Before the mandate, only 40 % of the new residential homes in Hawaii had solar water heaters, estimates Ron Richmond. The Business Development Manager of IISS and former member of the Board of the Hawaii Solar Energy Association (HSEA), however, thinks that there is still room for improvement: The new houses require no independent third-party inspection, because homeowners do not receive any funding from local utilities.
Source: IISS gathering official data

Albania: New Energy Law Shows Country’s Strong Commitment to Solar Thermal

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 25, 2013

The new Albanian law on Renewable Energy Sources No. 138/2013 from 2 May 2013, which was published in the Official Gazette No. 83 on 20 May 2013, requires builders to adhere to a minimum share of solar thermal heat for certain building types. Furthermore, the so-called RES Law exempts solar thermal systems and components from custom tariffs and Value Added Tax (VAT) altogether. Starting from the day the law was enacted on 20 May 2013, the government has 6 to 12 months to create the bylaws which should state precisely how the new law will be implemented. The RES Law is the first Albanian law addressing SWH systems in particular (see the attached legal document in Albanian) and representing an important part of Albania’s renewable energy policy. It, however, remains unclear how the budget to refinance the tax exemptions is to be allocated and whether the building regulations will be as effective as expected.
Photo: Endrit Mema

France: Influence of New Building Standards in 2013

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 19, 2012

The solar thermal industry in France looks with mixed feelings to next year. Certain system suppliers are convinced that the French building regulation RT2012 will push solar water heaters in the residential segment in 2013. In contrast, others are afraid that hot water heat pumps will make the race because electricity prices are still low and the heat pump lobby is well represented across the country. Together with the low-energy building label BBC, the previous RT2005 regulation have proven to be rather successful in the last three years and especially in 2012 with regard to solar thermal systems in multi-family houses. It is still unclear how the new regulation RT2012 will affect the implementation of this technology. The chart shows the steps that have been taken to ensure a zero-energy or energy-positive housing standard in new buildings in 2020.
Chart: homeenergypros.lbl.gov

Pages

Search results

  • Six Pillars : Residential