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Training and Education

Lesotho, Mozambique and Zimbabwe: Solar Thermal Policies under Development

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 10, 2016
University ZimbabweA growing number of countries in Southern Africa follow the example of South Africa and Namibia to set targets and discuss regulations for an increased deployment of solar water heaters. The reasons are the acute power shortages and the fact that residential households spend 60 % of their electricity on hot water preparation when they use an electric geyser. Lesotho and Zimbabwe launched national strategies in September 2015 to ban electric geysers and Mozambique’s Minister of Science, Technology, Higher Education and Professional Training, Professor Jorge Olívio Nhambiu, confirmed the target of installing 0.1 m² collector area per capita by 2030, as had been defined in the Solar Thermal Technology Roadmap for Zimbabwe in November 2015. The photo shows the Solar Energy Mobile Training Unit showcased during an open day at the University of Zimbabwe.
Photo: SOLTRAIN Zimbabwe/2015

SOLTRAIN: 2,150 Technicians Trained and 187 Demonstration Systems Installed in SADC Region

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 1, 2016
SOLTRAIN ConferenceThe Southern African Solar Thermal Training and Demonstration Initiative (SOLTRAIN) presented the project’s remarkable progress since 2009 during a conference in Midrand, South Africa, on 11 February 2016. “Between 2009 and 2015, about 2,150 people have been trained in 80 courses, and nearly 187 solar thermal systems ranging from 2 to 250 m² collector area per system have been installed in the five target countries South Africa, Namibia, Lesotho, Mozambique and Zimbabwe,” Project Coordinator Werner Weiss, Managing Director of Austrian institute AEE INTEC, summed up the results. The photo shows the presentation of Dr Thembakazi Mali, Senior Manager Clean Energy Solutions at the South African National Energy Development Institute (SANEDI) on 11 February. The one-day conference was attended by 63 stakeholders from the SADC region. 
Photos (2): Monika Spörk-Dür

Quality Infrastructure Crucial to Emerging Markets

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 11, 2016
IRENA 2In December 2015, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) published a comprehensive report on how to establish a quality infrastructure (QI) for solar water heaters on small-scale markets (see the attached document). The 76-page study is part of a series on Quality Infrastructure for Renewable Energy, which uses information from 83 survey respondents and data from interviews with 34 experts on QIs for renewable energy sources. The report discusses established international system and collector testing standards as well as examples of implementation across selected countries. It also highlights market barriers and makes recommendations for developing solar water heater Qis, focusing mainly on emerging markets. The programme highlights the complexity of a quality infrastructure, including the establishment of a product label, test labs, installers’ certification and the involvement of inspection bodies.
Source: IRENA
 

Solar Cooling: Results Diagram Directs Stakeholders to Content of Interest

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 29, 2015
Task 48The best solar research results are of little use if they are not distributed and known to stakeholders from the industry, planning departments or public authorities involved in the related field work. This becomes an even more important point if the aim of the research is to “assist with the developing of a strong and sustainable market”. One example: Task 48 (Quality Assurance & Support Measures for Solar Cooling Systems) under the auspices of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling programme. Between October 2011 and March 2015, a very dynamic group of 30 solar cooling experts teamed up to work on a wide range of topics. As many as 180 person months of research were at the disposal of the programme’s coordinators, which created a lot of interesting output. The cooling specialists accepted and met the challenge by presenting results in a clear structure on the above-shown diagram. The so-called Task 48 Results Diagram could serve as a best-practice model for other international research projects.
Source: task48.iea-shc.org/
 

IEA SHC Task 51: Urban Planners Know Little about Solar Energy Potential

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 3, 2015
IEA SHC Task 51During IEA SHC Task 51, Solar Energy in Urban Planning, the project partners evaluated the legal, process and education issues of solar in urban planning across the twelve member countries. What they found was: Planners and architects know little about the opportunities of solar energy usage. Solar energy in urban planning is also rarely a topic during university courses for architects or urban planners. The photo shows participants of the latest Task 51 meeting visiting a big PV installation. The meeting was held on the French island of Réunion from 28 September to 2 October. The task is about all types of solar energy. 
Photo: Maria Wall
 

Egypt and India: UNIDO Supports Industrial Solar Heat

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 22, 2015
UNIDOThe United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) started two projects in the first quarter of this year with the aim of increasing the deployment of solar process heat: January of 2015 marked the launch of a 5-year programme in cooperation with the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) to promote business models for an increased market penetration and scale of concentrated solar thermal heating and cooling applications. Three months later, UNIDO launched the 5-year programme Utilizing Solar Energy for Industrial Process Heat in Egyptian Industry together with the Egyptian Ministry of Industry, Trade and Small and Medium Enterprises. Both projects are funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF). 
Figure: UNIDO
 

Position Paper: Actions Needed to Pave Way for Net Zero Energy Buildings

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 3, 2015

Over 40 % of primary energy use and 24 % of greenhouse gas emissions are attributed to global energy use in buildings so architects and builders are being posed the challenge of creating highly energy-efficient structures. One vision promoted by stakeholders in many countries worldwide is Net Zero Energy Buildings (NetZEBs). To provide an analysis of the market potential and the actions required for a market uptake of this architectural design approach, the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme published a position paper entitled SHC Net Zero Energy Solar Buildings in June. The 10-page summary is based on the insights of 82 experts from 19 countries, who have been conducting research within a joint IEA SHC Task 40 and Annex 52 of the Energy in Buildings and Communities Programme (EBCP) over several years (see the attached document). The photos show three French NetZEBs: a university research building on the tropical Island of La Reunion, an office building in Paris and a school in the city of Poitou‐Charentes.
Source: SHC Task 40/EBC Annex 42, A review of 30 NetZEB case studies worldwide

How To – Solar Hot Water (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 21, 2015

This is a how-to instructional guide on how to make your own solar thermal hot water heating system. It was created by the website GreenPowerScience.com. The guide explains how to devise a soalr thermal hot water heating system using a black rubber hose and a heat exchanger. The step by step walks the user through how to build and install the system and the various options they have in doing so.

Author: GreenPowerScience.com

 

Date of Publication: February 21, 2008

Pages: 8

Solar Thermal Design and Installation 101 (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 21, 2015

This informational guide was created by the Heatspring Learning Institute. It covers the basics of both the design of solar thermal hot water heating systems and the installation of the systems.

MENA: First Online Training Program on Solar Water Heaters Certification

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 21, 2015
SHAMCI TrainingIn March, the Regional Center for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (RCREEE) launched an online training program on the Solar Water Heaters (SWHs) Quality Assurance and Certification Scheme in the Arab region. The training course aims to provide participants with sufficient knowledge on SWH quality and certification schemes, such as the Solar Heating Arab Mark and Certification Initiative (SHAMCI). Participants can register for the training course online. According to the RCREEE, it is the first online training in the Middle East and North Africa region. The implementation of the course was supported by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).
Source: SHAMCI.net
 

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