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Guidebook for the Development of a Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action for Solar Water Heaters

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on October 13, 2014

Reflecting the changing balance in global greenhouse gas emissions, NAMAs embody the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. In addition to developed countries’ commitments to make quantitative reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, developing countries are invited to contribute with voluntary actions that are ‘nationally appropriate’ deviations from ‘business as usual’ emissions scenarios. Such deviations may be captured in low-carbon (or low-emission) development strategies, and then implemented as NAMAs

This guidebook provides an introduction to designing government-led interventions to scale up investment in solar water heating (SWH) markets, showing how these interventions can be packaged as Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS).

Reflecting the changing balance in global greenhouse gas emissions, NAMAs embody the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. In addition to developed countries’ commitments to make quantitative reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, developing countries are invited to contribute with voluntary actions that are ‘nationally appropriate’ deviations from ‘business as usual’ emissions scenarios. Such deviations may be captured in low-carbon (or low-emission) development strategies, and then implemented as NAMAs.

Solar Water Heating Systems in the Tourist Industry (2014)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on September 25, 2014

This document was presented at the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) event on Renewable Energy Applications for Island Tourism, held in Cyprus on 29-30 June 2014. A link to the event’s summary, agenda and documents is available here. The presentation was made by Tassos Frantzis, owner of Vesta Solar Heaters Ltd., a manufacturing company of solar thermal systems and member of ΕΒΗΕΚ (Cyprus Union Of Solar Energy Industrialists).

Study on Good Practices for Solar Water Heating in Multifamily Housing

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on September 22, 2014

This study analyses technological and social barriers against the use of solar water heating (SWH) systems and compile the best practice to select and take decisions on the design of a SWH system. Possible barriers are divided into 5 groups (hydraulic installations, entitlement to sunshine, current regulation, community collaboration, new businesses), as well as best practice (concept selection, equipment selection, control systems, operation and maintenance, general considerations).

The study highlights how the main barriers to the development of SWH are social, while aware community collaboration is fundamental for the best use of SWH systems.

Study on Mexican Legislation on Renewable Energy Impacting the Solar Water Heating Market (2014)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on September 17, 2014

The study analyses and proposes improvements to Mexican legislation to expand the use of solar water heating (SWH) and its application at local and national level. The document is divided into four sections: identification of current laws on renewable energy, identification of existing local and national instruments to promote SWH, development of a three-level action plan to promote the use of SWH and preparation of an implementation guide.

The National Energy Efficiency Action Plan for Lebanon NEEAP 2011-2015

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on September 16, 2014

This report presents the national energy efficiency action plan (NEEAP) for Lebanon for the years 2011-2015. The action plan is presented in two different formats: Section 1- including the 14-initiative narrative NEEAP, and Section 2- including the tabulated format. The proposed NEEAP is also developed in accordance with the different points mentioned in the declaration of the Lebanese Government relating to energy efficiency and renewable energy, namely the set strategic target of 12% renewable energy by 2020.

Renewable Energies for Remote Areas and Islands (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on September 11, 2014

The Renewable Energy Technology Deployment, a sub-group of the International Energy Agency with the mandate to accelerate the market introduction and deployment of renewable energy technologies, issued in 2012 a report on the possibility of deploying renewable energy technologies into remote islands and regions. The communities studied in the report live in different climate conditions and latitudes, from Alaska to Spain, from Japan to Ecuador, but face similar problems in terms of distance from more populated areas. The report shows technical, economic and energy issues facing remote areas; it provides examples, perspectives and inspiration on how to develop sustainable energy strategies, ultimately reducing long-term costs of energy.

China: Engineering Segment Drives Solar Thermal Market

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 27, 2014
China building integrationThe make-up of China’s solar thermal market is changing: The segment that used to guarantee the industry’s profits, the retail business of small thermosiphon systems for private households, has been declining in recent years. Other solar thermal segments, however, have been taking off in the meantime – for example, the market for more sophisticated solar thermal installations that are integrated into blocks of flats, hospitals, schools or universities. There is also growing interest in medium- and high-temperature solar thermal systems for industrial process heat. According to the annual surveys and market reports by Sun’s Vision, a consultancy located in Shandong province, the so-called solar thermal engineering market, which includes building integration and industrial process heat systems, increased by 50% in 2012 and 2013, after having grown by 35 % in 2011. The pie chart shows the individual categories of the building integration segment in 2013, which was the main driver of the national market.
Source: Sun´s Vision
 

China: No Sales Permit without Solar

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 21, 2014
China mandatory lawsIn 2007, some provincial and city governments in China began to implement solar installation requirements. Since then, an increasing number of authorities at different administrative levels have made the installation of solar thermal systems mandatory in new-builds in the residential and public sector, for example, in universities, schools, hospitals and nursing homes. The documents which have led to the development of provincial and municipal solar water heater installation requirements were the 11th Five-Year Plan New Energy and Renewable Energy Development (2006-2010) and the Renewable Energy Law of China. Despite some past announcements, there have not yet been any solar building requirements at national level. 
Photo: Simon Goess
 

Uruguay: New Solar Thermal Regulations

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 3, 2014
Uruguay regulatiosSince 14 May 2014, Uruguay has had technical specifications for solar thermal installations. It was on this very day that the Ministry of Energy, Industry and Mines approved the first edition of the Especificaciones Técnicas Uruguayas (ETUS), the Uruguayan Technical Specifications for all registered solar thermal installations in the country. These requirements are obligatory for all public buildings and all public enterprises, such as the state energy utility UTE, the National Administration of Telecommunications, ANTEL, and state-owned oil, cement and gas supplier ANCAP, as well as for residential installations by homeowners or solar systems at private companies, such as hotels or hospitals. The photo shows a thermosiphon system which was installed under the requirements of Mesa Solar which includes the same requirements as ETUS for thermosiphon systems.
Photo: Eliseo Cabrera
 

IEA Study: “Renewable energy for heat deserves greater attention”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 6, 2014

In April, the International Energy Agency (IEA) published the paper “Heating Without Global Warming. Market Development and Policy Considerations for Renewable Heat”. The 92-page study looks at today’s renewable energy use for heat and at its future prospects and development needs (see the attached document). The IEA study is an important document, because it has been the first IEA publication focusing on the renewable heating sector for five years and it includes the three technologies bioenergy, solar thermal and geothermal. Paolo Frankl, Head of the IEA’s Renewable Energy Division in Paris, France, had already announced the study at the international conference SHC 2013 in Freiburg last year. “We want to raise the attention for renewable heat technologies in the policy arena through analysing and making scenarios,” Frankl explained in an interview with solarthermalworld.org.
Source: IEA

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