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Policy, Jordan

Israel: Front runner in Solar Building Code with Strong Impact on Market

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 13, 2015
Total installed collector area per inhabitantThe Middle East is a hub for solar energy deployment. Three countries from this region were among the ones with the highest total installed capacity of glazed water collectors in operation per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2013: Israel, the Palestinian territories and Jordan. Israel is the front runner when it comes to building codes. It was the first country worldwide to pass a solar building law – back in 1980. The law stipulates the installation of a solar water heating system for new residential buildings up to a height of 27 m, which is about 8 to 9 floors. This law was extended in September 2012 and now also applies to buildings above 27 m, stipulating the installation of solar water heaters for the first seven floors under the roof.
Source: Solar Heat Worldwide
 

Jordan: “The solar bylaw is not going to have a strong impact on the market”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 6, 2015
Millennium Solar EnergySince April 2013, Jordan has had a solar bylaw in place. The rules of the bylaw were stipulated in Article 10 of Law No. 73, which had already entered into force in 2012. Solar water heaters are a mandatory requirement for every new multi-family building with more than 150 m² of living space, for every new office building exceeding 100 m² of floor space, as well as each new public building with more than 250 m². There are, however, no additional regulations regarding quality standards or system sizes. Solarthermalworld.org spoke with Angelika Cerny, International Sales Coordinator at Jordan-based solar thermal turnkey-solution provider Millennium Energy Industries (MEI), about the effectiveness of the bylaw and the market development in Jordan. The photo shows an 80 m2 vacuum tube collector field which was set up in 2013 as a pergola for the office building of Jordan company EDGO Ventures in Amman. 
Photo: Millennium Solar Energy
 

Bylaw in Jordan

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 6, 2015
In 2012, the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources along with the National Energy Research Center in Jordan approved a solar bylaw which entered into force in April 2013 (see the attached document). According to Article 10 of Law No. 73, solar water heaters are a mandatory requirement for every new multi-family building with more than 150 m² of living space, for every new office building exceeding 100 m² of floor space, as well as each new public building with more than 250 m². The bylaw encourages spreading the national awareness in the field of conservation of energy and improvement of its efficiency and helps establishing a database related to conservation of energy and improvement of its efficiency. There are, however, no additional regulations regarding quality standards or system sizes.

Solar Water Heaters Development in MENA Region (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 13, 2012

This is a presentation from Dr. Mohamad Kordab (Energy Expert of the Damascus University) during the “Solar Thermal Applications workshop” held in Syria. The event was jointly organized by the Regional Center for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (RCREEE), regional organizations from Syria and Egypt and the German Development Cooperation (GTZ).

Initial Market Assessment Report North Africa & Middle East (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 7, 2012

This report is one of the deliverables of the Global Solar Water Heating Market Transformation and Strengthening Initiative (GSWH Project), co-executed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and funded by the Global Environnemental Fund with co-financing of International Copper Association.

Given the focus on the Mediterranean basin, the Observatoire Méditerranéen de l’Energie (OME) was chosen as the regional partner of this project. The objective of the report is to provide the existing status and overview of solar water heating (SWH) industry in the country with respect to the solar energy applicability for water heating applications, achieved or installed capacities, supportive institutional and policy frameworks.

Solar Thermal Application in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinian Territories, Syria and Tunisia (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on October 14, 2011

This paper is the Cairo workshop report concerning Solar Water Heater (SWH) technologies used in the six Arab countries. The workshop was organized by the Egyptian-German Private Sector Development Programme (PSDP) in cooperation with GIZ (German Society for International Cooperation) and with the support of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. The aim was to compare the use of SWH technologies and to present a SWH market overview of those countries.

SWHs Industry in Syria. Current Situation & Prospects (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on March 22, 2011

This presentation was made during the Workshop on Solar Thermal Applications in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan which took place in Cairo, on 24 March 2009.

The document includes vast information on Syria (energy indicators, an assessment of the energy sector, analysis of the electricity demand, state of the art of the solar water heating technology and industry, R&D, standards and regulations, etc).

Commitments Toward Wind and Energy Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy Integration in Algeria, Jordan, Tunisia and Turkey (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on July 5, 2010

The REMAP Project (Action Plan for High Priority Renewable Energy Initiatives in Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Area) is a two years initiative funded under the European Commission FP6 with the goal of investigating two electricity generation technologies: wind power and concentrated solar power, in nine European and Mediterranean countries (Algeria, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Jordan, Spain, Tunisia and Turkey).

Concentrating Solar Power: Global Outlook 09

Submitted by Hans Craen on June 26, 2009

This 2009 report looks into the global outlook of concentrating solar power (CSP). The report first looks into the different CSP technologies and makes a comparison based on the advantages and disadvantages. The report also provides an overview of the CSP development by region. For certain countries per region a more detailed assessment is provided. In particular, the potential of the Mediterranean and the MENA region is being assessed.

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