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Solar Thermal Power, Policy

Solar Thermal Trends, Performance-Based Incentives, and RPS (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This presentation was created by the Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) and was presented originally as a webinar. It focuses on trends in solar thermal and the implementation of solar thermal technology as part of renewable energy statewide portfolios. In 2011, the largest growth in the use of residential solar thermal water heating took place in Hawaii. However, there was also steady growth in commercial use in states such as California.

CoSEIA Suggested Solar Thermal Permit Submittal Guidelines for Colorado (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This document is intended to help Cities, Counties and the entire State of Colorado understand Solar Heat.  In order for there to be a growth in the Solar Industry, these jurisdictions must be informed on how new solar technology will work with older solar technology.

 

Building a Solar Future – Recovering America’s Homes, Businesses and Industry with Solar Energy (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 16, 2015

This report was put out in 2010 by Environment America Research & Police Center. The basis of this report is America’s potential and how the goal should be set to obtain 10 percent or more total energy consumption from the sun by 2030 using solar technology. Technologies described to accomplish this include: concentrating solar power, solar water heaters, solar space heating/cooling, and passive solar design. Through the use of these technologies, it can affect homes, businesses, transportation and entire communities.

Worldwide capacity of solar thermal energy greatly underestimated (2004)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 16, 2015

This statement was released by the International Energy Association (IEA). The IEA’s Solar Heating and Cooling Programme and major solar thermal trade associations released these new statistics in GWth, rather than square meters. They state this as the reason for the underestimation of the solar thermal capacity. By using square meters of collector area, you’re not using a unit comparable with any other energy sources.

Current Status of Solar Thermal Power in California (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 14, 2015

This presentation from San Diego State University reviews the status of solar thermal energy in California. Parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, central tower receivers, and parabolic dishes are all discussed as the present solar thermal methods in California. The Rankine, Stirling, and Brayton Cycles are visually represented and discussed in the presentation as well.

Life Cycle Considerations for Solar Energy Technologies (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on May 24, 2015

This document was created and published by Maxwell K. Micali of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). It provides an overview of various life cycle considerations as they apply to the use of solar energy technologies.

Building a Solar Future – Recovering America’s Homes, Businesses and Industry with Solar Energy (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 22, 2015

This report was put out in 2010 by Environment America Research & Police Center. The basis of this report is America’s potential and how the goal should be set to obtain 10 percent or more total energy consumption from the sun by 2030 using solar technology.

Resolution E-4188 (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 6, 2015

This document from the Public Utilities Commission of the State of California is an approval of a renewable portfolio standard power purchase agreement with Gaskell SunTower, LLC (Gaskell), owned by eSolar.  This contract complies with the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) procurement guidelines.  Gaskell SunTower, (LLC) is a new solar thermal generating facility being developed by eSolar.

SOLARGENIX ENERGY, LLC Proposed Guidelines for Implementing California’s Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS). (2004)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 6, 2015

Solar thermal generation (with gas assist) has been shown to be cost competitive when compared to other similar fossil technologies providing comparable products, i.e. firm on-peak capacity and energy.  The recently published CEC Cost Comparison Report concluded that, essentially, solar thermal generation with gas assist is cost competitive to combustion turbine technology when used in the same application (firm peaking).  

Arizona Solar Energy and Economics Outlook (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on March 14, 2015

This report was arranged by William P. Patton, Ph. D., Economic and Business Research Center, University of Arizona. The document discusses the need for the United States to make the switch from fossil fuels to solar energy as a more reliable and environmentally sound energy source.A study was conducted in Arizona in order to discover the potential for solar electric generation in Arizona and also to figure out the economic and environmental impacts on the increased use of solar power.

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