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Solar Thermal Power, Process Heat

IEA SHC Task 46: Bankable Solar Data Sets for Concentrating Technologies

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 2, 2016
Whether investors put their money into large-scale concentrating solar heat and power systems, solar district heating plants or photovoltaic fields, they need to be able to rely on data sets to include the uncertainty and variability of input information. Financial institutions do like to know in what way these factors can impact revenue flows in financing, so researchers of IEA SHC Task 46, Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting, have spent several years analysing various approaches to the topic. The flow chart of the financing model shows that solar resource data is essential to a proper assessment of the average power or heat generation per year as well as the range of variability over several years. SHC Task 46 is a five-year collaborative effort (2011-2016) with support from the IEA SolarPaces Programme (Task V) and the IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme (Task 14).
Chart: Manuel Blanco, SolarPaces
 

Resource/Cost Estimates For Solar Thermal Space/Water Heating (2010-2020)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 25, 2015

The Solar heat resource is dependent in the first instance on the insolation falling on the surface of Ireland. The usable power generated by solar panels will vary depending on latitude, time of year and weather conditions. According to the European Solar Thermal Industry Federation, current technology produces per square metre of solar panel between 300 and 450 thermal kWh/year.  The resource area is based on the roof area of existing and future dwellings.

Low-cost Distributed Solar-thermal-electric Power Generation (2004)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 6, 2015

This report was written by A. Der Minassians et. al. of UC Berkley. It measures the feasibility of solar thermal systems used for electric power generation, which could compete for price parity with other sources of electricity. The paper claims that when using only low-cost materials and manufacturing processes it is still possible to design a solar thermal electric system. The collectors should operate at a medium temperature of 125C to 150C.

Solar Power System for Lunar ISRU Applications (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on May 24, 2015

This paper was written by Takashi Nakamura and Benjamin K. Smith of Physical Sciences, Inc. It reports on a project their company has undertaken, to create a solar thermal system that can effectively be used as a means of oxygen production from lunar regolith, which is the top layer of material on the moon.

EISG Final Report: Solar Thermal Heat Pump/Chiller (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 18, 2015

This is a report on the Solar Thermal Heat Pump/Chiller the “Helisorber” that was done at the conclusion of a research project on the product funded by the Energy Innovations Small Grant (EISG) Program, administered by the California Energy Commission.

The “Helisorber” heat pump when coupled with a low-concentration solar collector is capable of providing chilling and heat pumped hot water.

Advancement of Solar Thermal Technologies (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 6, 2015

This presentation was created by Jane H. Davidson of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. It focuses on large scale power generation for possible industrial use of solar thermal.

According to the presentation, concentrated solar power in the Southwest United States could be the most low cost and effective form of large scale utility generation in the region. However, some technical barriers remain to the technology, including the storage issue and inefficient receivers.

Solar Thermal Mayo Energy Agency Ltd. (Date no Specified)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 6, 2015

Since the beginning of time, the sun has been the source of energy and life on earth. It is a huge nuclear reactor, at 6,000 ºC, which provides our planet with heat and light. A solar water heater is an efficient and reliable technology that converts sunlight into heat to produce your hot water.  Solar thermal technology is for water heating. Active space (or air) heating for large buildings can also be achieved by solar ventilation systems.

Developments of Solar Thermal in China (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on September 18, 2012

This presentation was given as Tsinghua University in 2011, and gives a chronological overview of the rapid development of China's solar thermal market since 1978, where research first began. The research projects described in the presentation have successfully commercialised solar water heating, which had a 50.8% market share of Chinese water heating in 2008.

Solar Heat Worldwide - Markets and Contribution to Energy Supply 2010 (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on May 21, 2012

This report has been written by Werner Weiss and Franz Mauthner in contribution to the International Energy Agency (IEA)’s Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC). It documents the solar thermal capacity installed in 55 countries, and ascertains the contribution of solar thermal systems to the supply of energy and the CO¬2 emissions avoided as a result of operating these systems.

CERN’s Ultra High Vacuum Flat Plate Solar Collector Markets and Applications (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on August 4, 2011

This is a presentation from the CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research) about solar thermal technologies and applications.

The presentation reviews the different market applications (hot water and heating, space heating and cooling, desalination, pool heating, industrial processes and electricity production). It also gives data on the European energy market and the market share of the different solar technologies. The document indicates the market drivers for solar thermal and the forecasts for the coming years.

 

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