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Solar Thermal Power, USA

Concentrated Solar Power: Focusing the Sun’s Energy for Large‐scale Power Generation (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 21, 2015

This factsheet was created by Tracy Jennings and Laura Parsons of the Environmental and Energy Study Institute based in Washington D.C. It focuses on the various system types of concentrating solar power and its key features. The factsheet gives a brief description of parabolic troughs, linear fresnol reflectors, dish/engine systems, and power towers; explaining how each system uses direct solar radiation for utility energy production. CSP systems require supplemental fuel sources or thermal storage operations to continue producing energy at night.

Solar Power for Tomorrow's World (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This presentation was created by Ken May of Abengoa Solar, and was published by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE). It explains the potential of solar thermal hot water heating to displace conventional electric use and create long term utility savings.

Solar Thermal Trends, Performance-Based Incentives, and RPS (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This presentation was created by the Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) and was presented originally as a webinar. It focuses on trends in solar thermal and the implementation of solar thermal technology as part of renewable energy statewide portfolios. In 2011, the largest growth in the use of residential solar thermal water heating took place in Hawaii. However, there was also steady growth in commercial use in states such as California.

SOLAR THERMAL ELECTRICITY AS THE PRIMARY REPLACEMENT FOR COAL AND OIL IN U.S. GENERATION AND TRANSPORTATION (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This report was arranged by Chairman David R. Mills and Chief Development Officer Robert G. Morgan of Ausra, Inc. in 2008. The report encourages people to look into solar thermal electricity as a healthier alternative to fossil fuels and oil in supplying energy for transportation.

Although solar thermal electricity had been very expensive to conduct at one time, the price for this technology is now decreasing.

COMPETITIVE SOLAR THERMAL POWER STATIONS UNTIL 2010 - THE CHALLENGE OF MARKET INTRODUCTION (1998)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This report was arranged by Franz Trieb, from the German Aerospace Center in 1998. The report looks into an alterative option for the world’s electricity market. Solar thermal power stations based on parabolic trough concentrating collectors could serve as a viable competitor.

In order to make this plan appealing to investors, it must possess three important attributes which are an acceptable technology, profit, and financial risk.

Solar Thermal Energy

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This report was arranged by solar-thermal and includes an overview on the benefits of solar energy. It then goes on to make a comparison between solar energy and photovoltaic energy, explaining how solar energy concentrates the light from the sun to create heat, while photovoltaic directly converts the sun’s light into electricity.

 

CoSEIA Suggested Solar Thermal Permit Submittal Guidelines for Colorado (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 20, 2015

This document is intended to help Cities, Counties and the entire State of Colorado understand Solar Heat.  In order for there to be a growth in the Solar Industry, these jurisdictions must be informed on how new solar technology will work with older solar technology.

 

Building a Solar Future – Recovering America’s Homes, Businesses and Industry with Solar Energy (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 16, 2015

This report was put out in 2010 by Environment America Research & Police Center. The basis of this report is America’s potential and how the goal should be set to obtain 10 percent or more total energy consumption from the sun by 2030 using solar technology. Technologies described to accomplish this include: concentrating solar power, solar water heaters, solar space heating/cooling, and passive solar design. Through the use of these technologies, it can affect homes, businesses, transportation and entire communities.

Concentrated Solar Power – Focusing the sun’s energy for large-scale power generation (2009)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 15, 2015

This fact sheet was written by the Environmental and Energy Study Institute in 2009. The document starts with a brief background on solar thermal energy and then describes the different types of solar thermal systems (parabolic trough, linear fresnal reflectors, dish/engine, power tower). It covers nighttime generation and how systems use supplemental fuels or thermal storage. The “Water and Land Impacts” section discusses land requirements for single rooftop systems to large power tower systems and water usage.

Solar Thermal Community Action – Canada (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 15, 2015

This is an action manual presented by the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) presented in 2008. The manual follows an agenda which starts with the solar thermal basics and applications and moves on to why solar thermal energy can succeed in Canada. It mentions the best economic choices for commercial and residential solar thermal systems and includes a solar resource assessment chart. This displays a map that is color-coded for the amount of solar radiation annually in Canada.

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