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Process Heat

Bonilait Dairy: Largest Solar Process Heat Installation in France

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 24, 2015
Bonilait FranceThe solar heat supply system of dairy processor Bonilait Protéines, which has its factory near the French town of Poitiers, is a unique showcase in many ways. First of all, it is currently the largest solar process heat installation in France. Second, it is equipped with drainback technology delivered by Belgium company Sunoptimo. And third, it is the first solar process heat installation which is operated by EDF Optimal Solutions as an Energy Service Company (ESCO). EDF Optimal Solutions is a provider of energy efficient solutions for all kinds of commercial users in a variety of sectors. The photo shows the around 1,500 m² collector field with flat plate collectors of type Vitosol 200 delivered by German heating boiler manufacturer Viessmann and installed on a support structure above the parking lot next to the factory.
Photo: Sunoptimo
 

Egypt and India: UNIDO Supports Industrial Solar Heat

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 22, 2015
UNIDOThe United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) started two projects in the first quarter of this year with the aim of increasing the deployment of solar process heat: January of 2015 marked the launch of a 5-year programme in cooperation with the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) to promote business models for an increased market penetration and scale of concentrated solar thermal heating and cooling applications. Three months later, UNIDO launched the 5-year programme Utilizing Solar Energy for Industrial Process Heat in Egyptian Industry together with the Egyptian Ministry of Industry, Trade and Small and Medium Enterprises. Both projects are funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF). 
Figure: UNIDO
 

IEA SHC: 20 Country Profile Analyse Market and Industry Development

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 3, 2015
SHC country members“The Renewable Heat Incentive in the United Kingdom has failed to stimulate the market for solar thermal, which continues to contract. There are technical issues in the regulations preventing the use of solar thermal with other renewable heating systems, such as biomass and heat pumps, and the subsidy rate is relatively low compared to the feed-in tariff for solar photovoltaics.” This clear statement was made by Dr Robert Edwards, Director in the Science and Innovation Group at the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). He represents the country in the Executive Committee of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) research programme and delivered an updated country profile of the British solar thermal market in June 2015. As part of its services, the IEA SHC programme publishes updated market profiles of all 20 member countries each year. You will find the list of member countries online and the link to the country profile at the bottom of each country page. The statement by Edwards is part of the latest UK country profile.
 

Germany: Label for Existing Heating Boilers to Increase Retrofit Share

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 31, 2015
MAP StatisticsFinally some good news from Germany, the largest market in Europe, which declined for four years in a row between 2011 and 2014. After a very sluggish first quarter in 2015, demand for solar thermal systems was increasing over the summer months because of the increased subsidy levels of the German Market Rebate Programme for Renewable Energies since April 2015. The number of applications for solar thermal systems in June and July was 31 % higher than in the previous year. The chart shows the applications submitted per month, with the green columns depicting 2014 and the orange columns representing 2015. And there is more good news for the sector: the announced energy label for existing heating boilers. 
Source: Federal Office for Economic Affairs and Export Control, BAFA
 

IEA SHC: Attractive Solar Process Heat Markets

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 28, 2015
fastest growing segmentWhich countries are currently attractive markets for solar process heat? Different sources give different answers to this question. The chart above shows the assessment of the solar industry. More than 30 % of the Austrian solar collector manufacturers in the two surveys in 2012 and 2013 assumed that solar process heat was the fastest-growing segment in their national market. More than every tenth manufacturer in Germany, Mexico and France shared their opinion. The figure in brackets behind the country stands for the number of surveys analysed. Some of the countries, such as Germany, India, Mexico and France, have a support scheme in place which focuses on solar process heat systems. 
Chart: solrico
 

USA: Ups and Downs of Californian Incentive Levels and Application Numbers

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 25, 2015
USA California StatisticsIf there were an award for the most transparent support programme in the field of solar heating and cooling, then the California Solar Initiative (CSI) – Thermal Program would get the prize. The CSI-T programme offers a regularly updated and publicly available Excel file of all submitted, approved and paid applications, and this file also includes an amazing amount of additional information, such as collector size, system supplier, contractor for the installation, total project costs or the application itself. The chart above, provided by Lewis Bichkoff, Lead Analyst of the CSI Thermal Program at the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), shows the subsidised and installed collector area per year. The annual volume shows significant growth from 953 m² (10,247 ft²) installed and granted during the first year to 36,641 m² (394,401 ft²) in 2014. In 2014, there was a noticeable dominance of pool heating systems, which made up 71 % of the total subsidised collector area.
Chart: CPUC
 

Austria: Results of 40 Monitored, Non-Residential Projects

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 29, 2015

The sixth invitation to tender for large-scale solar thermal systems in Austria is still accepting applications until 24 September. The Austrian Climate and Energy Fund has again allocated a budget of EUR 5.9 million for installing collector fields of between 100 and 2,000 m2 for process heat, district heating, solar cooling, systems with high solar coverage above 20 % in trade and business and innovative technologies. The subsidy covers 40 % of the additional, environmentally relevant costs of the installation and grants a 5 % bonus for small and medium enterprises. As in the past, applicants must consult with experts from one of the three selected Austrian research institutes before submitting their proposal. Over the first five years, the Austrian Climate and Energy Fund spent EUR 17,258,324 on 163 projects. The pie chart shows the distribution of the 163 approved projects broken down by application.
Figure: Austrian Climate and Energy Fund

Italy: Solar Steam for Cheese Production

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 24, 2015
CSP San NicoloDirect steam production, 50,000 litres of diesel saved per year and the advantage of the Italian incentive scheme for renewable heat: All these favourable conditions allowed a small dairy in Sardinia to choose a concentrated solar thermal plant with Fresnel collectors for generating 200 °C steam. The steam is used to supply heat to the industrial processes for cheese production. The investment of EUR 400,000 will have a payback period of about 4 years.
Source: CSP-F Solar
 

India: Solar Process Heat with less than 18-Month Payback Period

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 14, 2015
Sharman Shawls“Where there’s a will, there’s a way” is the slogan at Sharman Shawls, one of India’s leading garment industry and export companies. Based in Punjab state in northern India, Sharman Shawls uses diesel to meet the hot water requirements for dyeing, bleaching and washing garments. The enterprise’s daily consumption is close to 200,000 litres of water and the processes require almost 1,700 litres of diesel per day. 180 flat plate collectors preheat hot water to 80 °C, saving 82 litres of diesel at 300 days a year. Space constraints have limited the diesel saving per day to 5 %.
Photo: Jaideep Malaviya
 

Webinar: New Business Models for Commercial Solar Thermal Applications

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 29, 2015
Webinar ISESThe solar thermal industry is facing a great challenge in entering new commercial solar thermal markets, be it tourism, solar process heat or large solar district heating. It needs new business models to convince commercial customers to use or to invest in solar thermal. A webinar jointly organised by International Solar Energy Society (ISES) and solarthermalworld.org on 23 June 2015 thoroughly analysed the current situation during presentations by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and three turnkey system suppliers: Industrial Solar, Germany, S.O.L.I.D., Austria, and Nextility, USA (find all four presentations attached to this news article). One thing to take away from the webinar was: Financing is a crucial bottleneck for large-scale turnkey system suppliers.
 

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