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Heat Storage

Cost-Effective Use of Solar Energy in East African Horticulture (2013)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on March 3, 2015

This brochure was published by the Consortium Green Farming, which consists of 25 Dutch companies active in the horticulture technologies and provides support to development projects in East Africa.

India: First Solar Thermal Steam Storage for Cooking Applications

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 23, 2014
India Steam StorageThe Ramakrishna Mission Student’s Home in the city of Chennai, the capital of Tamil Nadu state on India’s southeast coast, is a combined residential high school and polytechnic college. It caters for around 700 orphan and poor students by providing free education, food and accommodation each year. The kitchen, which is supplied by Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), has witnessed a sudden increase in costs because reductions in subsidies have led to rising energy prices. Hence, the mission’s management decided on a solar concentrating system in order to reduce LPG demand for cooking. The dish concentrator was installed three months ago. 
Photo: Clique Solar
 

Active Solar Thermal Energy Applications in Buildings (2014)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on November 27, 2014

This presentation was prepared by Xavier Dubuisson and presented at the Yerevan State University of Architecture and Construction, in Armenia. The presentation is part of the Inogate Project, a regional energy cooperation programme between the European Union and 11 partner countries in Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia.

Guidelines for Determining the Tax Credit for Investing in Renewable Energy Property (2014)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on October 7, 2014

This document provides information and guidelines on tax credits resulting from investing in renewable energies in North Carolina. It provides a legislative background of the issue dating back to 1999 as well as punctual information on credit ceilings, definitions, eligibility, requirements, frequently asked questions and tax credit amount for each type of renewable energy considered.

Denmark: 37 MW Field with 203,000 m³ Storage Underway

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 30, 2014
Vojens Seasonal StorageConstruction has begun on another large-scale installation: This time, the new number one solar thermal plant in the world will be in Vojens, a small town in southern Denmark, near the city of Kolding. The customer is Vojens District, which signed a contract with Danish collector manufacturer Arcon Solar this May about delivering and installing a 37 MWth collector field (52,491 m²). The 4,166 collectors will all be produced in Arcon´s factory in Aalborg. At present, the seasonal pit heat storage with 203,000 m³ is underway: Vojens District is uploading pictures once a month and the ones from August show the lining of the huge water-filled basin with high-density polyethylene foil (see photo). The currently largest solar thermal plant, a 26 MWth installation with 61,700 m³ of seasonal storage, is located in the Danish town of Dronninglund.
Photo: Vojens District
 

Denmark: Dronninglund Inaugurates 26 MWth Solar District Heating Plant

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 1, 2014
Dronninglund1The world’s currently largest solar district heating plant was inaugurated in Dronninglund, Denmark, on 2 May this year. The photo shows Carsten Møller Nielsen, Board Chairman at Dronninglund Fjernvarme, welcoming Rasmus Helveg Petersen, Danish Minister for Climate, Energy and Building (to the left of the speaker). The system consists of 2,982 collectors with a total solar thermal capacity of 26 MWth (37,573 m²) and a 61,700 m³ seasonal pit heat storage and is planned to provide about 15,000 MWh per year. Its output will meet half of the annual heat demand of the plant’s 1,350 customers. According to the local district heating supplier Dronninglund Fjernvarme, the total investment costs for the plant amounted to DKK 106 million (EUR 14.6 million), of which EUR 6.1 million were invested in the solar installation (see the chart below). The plant was subsidised by the Danish Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Program, EUDP, which supported the project with Danish Krone (DKK) 21 million (EUR 2.953 Mio). The payback period is said to be 25 years. Solarthermalworld.org spoke with Søren Elisiussen, CEO at Arcon Solar, which delivered the collectors and the support structure for the solar field, about the plant’s technical specifications.
Photo: Arcon Solar
 

Germany: H.M. Heizkörper Plans to Mass-Produce Latent Heat Storage Units

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 13, 2014
ThermobatterieThe Thermobatterie (English: thermal battery), a latent heat storage unit by German manufacturer H.M. Heizkörper, makes it possible to absorb generated thermal energy and store up to two-thirds of it as latent heat without time restraints or heat losses. If required, the energy can later be released in suitable amounts and used in different application areas. The other third of the absorbed thermal energy will be stored conventionally as sensible heat, meaning heat that can be felt physically. solarthermalworld.org spoke with Project Manager Michael Sigwanz about the battery’s market potential and target groups and the advantages of a modular design. The photo shows the Thermobatterie in a single-family-house in Büttstedt, Germany. 
Photo: H.M. Heizkörper
 

SMEThermal 2014: “The challenge is the energy storage”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 2, 2014
latent heat storageLarge storage capacity, modular design, high storage density and low heat losses: These are the current requirements for solar thermal heat storage. The result is that hot water storage products are often stretched to their limits. Alternatives could be phase change materials (PCMs) or thermo-chemical materials (TCMs). During the SMEThermal 2014 conference in Berlin, Dr Henner Kerskes, Research Associate at the Research and Testing Centre for Thermal Solar Systems, TZS, of the University of Stuttgart, Germany, and Monte C Magill, Business Development Director at US company Entropy Solutions, explained the design, operation and possibilities of latent heat and thermo-chemical energy storage solutions (see the attached documents).
Photos: Stephanie Banse
 

Germany: Icy Solar Heat Storage

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 21, 2014
German engineering company Ökoplan has built a 1,586 m³ ice storage in one of Hamburg’s residential areas to save solar heat from summer for winter. Parts of the heating system have already begun operating; the start of the ice storage is scheduled for October 2014. The chiller with a thermal output of 600 kW will then run like a heat pump to extract the heat from the water in the ice storage. The operation temperature of the storage is between +20 and 0°C, also including the latent heat which becomes available when the water freezes. The solar heat will be used to melt the huge ice block between April and October in order to regenerate the storage during summer. 
Photo: Ökoplan

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