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District Heating, Europe

Solar District Heating: Good Performances All Over Europe

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 4, 2016
Crailsheim Monitoring ResultsThe 4th International Solar District Heating (SDH) Conference, which had been organised under the auspices of Horizon 2020 project SDHp2m…from Policy to Market on 21/22 September 2016 in Denmark, showed the importance of analysing real-life monitoring data from European SDH plants, with one conference session (Advanced SDH systems II) dedicated exclusively to the topic. These kinds of comparisons enable an understanding of the actual performance of such large collector fields and offer an opportunity for optimising power output and for creating best-practice examples of new plants. For example, the chart displays ten years’ worth of monitoring data from the German plant in Crailsheim, which has met solar yield expectations. 
Source: Attached SDH conference presentation from ITW
 

Top District Heating Countries – Euroheat & Power 2015 Survey Analysis

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 1, 2016
Euroheat & Power LogoSolar district heating has enjoyed increasing attention from all across Europe and China, triggered by Denmark’s enormous growth rates in the field. Until the end of last year, the Scandinavian country had seen 577 MW of solar thermal power fed into 79 district heating networks mostly run by municipalities. There are another 364 MWth in the pipeline, scheduled for the beginning of this year. To identify the countries with the largest potential for solar district heating, it is worth taking a closer look at the country-by-country statistics of the biennial Euroheat & Power publication, whose most current version is from March 2015 and includes the key market indicators. Euroheat & Power, the association for district heating and cooling, is headquartered in Brussels and has 11 full-time staff.
 

Europe: 23 New and Upgraded Solar District Heating Plants of 190 MWth Start Operation in 2015

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 5, 2016
District Heating EuropeAs in previous years, Denmark remained the country dominating Europe’s solar district heating market. Twenty of the 23 new and upgraded district heating plants in Europe above 350 kWth (500 m²) from the statistics compiled by Jan-Olof Dalenbäck from the Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, went into operation in Denmark – whereas Austria, Italy and Sweden had only one each to show for. Dalenbäck’s database shows 211 large-scale district heating plants currently in operation, with combined output at 708 MW (1.01 million m²). This means that only every fourth district heating plant in Europe uses solar energy compared to the 5,400 district heating systems a database from Swedish Halmstad University lists from across the EU-27. The map shows 2,188 cities with 2,445 larger district heating systems. The highest plant densities can be found in Denmark, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. 
Source: Heat Roadmap Europe 2050 - Second pre-study for the EU27 (see the attached document)
 

Europe: Strategy on Heating and Cooling Launches in February 2016

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 21, 2015
Maroš Šefčovič (left) and Miguel Arias CañeteThe publication of the EU Strategy on Heating and Cooling (Heat Strategy) is now scheduled for February 2016, when it will be published as part of the winter (legislative) package comprising a revised Security of Gas Supply Regulation and an EU strategy for liquefied natural gas. The Heat Strategy was supposed to be already out on 18 November 2015. The consultation process is now over and the ENER C3 unit of the Directorate General (DG) of Energy is drafting the final version. The photos show the two most important heads of European energy strategies, both with a five-year term up to 2019: Maroš Šefčovič from Slovakia, Vice-President of the European Commission and in charge of the Energy Union (left), and Miguel Arias Cañete from Spain, the commissioner for Energy and Climate Action. 
Photos: EU Commission
 

Central Europe: Solar District Heating Cost Comparison

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 15, 2015
Solites CostsGerman research institute Solites has compared different models of solar heat use in district heating networks by focusing on the economic viability of these projects. The study Solar Heat Networks for Baden-Württemberg – Fundamentals. Potentials. Strategies. published at the beginning of July was supported by the Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection and the Energy Sector of Baden-Württemberg, a federal state in the south of Germany (see the attached document in German). The authors of the study analyse seven different generic types of district heating systems which integrate solar thermal, and they come to the conclusion that type 3, 6 and 7, i.e., applications in small rural district heating systems as well as integrations into existing larger urban district heating systems, generate the lowest solar heat costs. On average, heat costs are around 60 EUR/MWh over a period of 25 years, excluding subsidies. In some cases, they even get below 50 EUR/MWh. 
Source: Solites 
 

Solar District Heating Guidelines: Collection of Factsheets WP3 – D3.1 & D 3.2 (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on April 3, 2015

This document, issued by the platform Solar District Heating (SDH) and supported by the Intelligent Energy Europe Programme of the European Union, gathers a series of factsheet aiming at helping those who plan to build a solar district plant.

Europe: Performance and Cost Comparisons of Larger Residential Solar Thermal Systems

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 2, 2014
As solar thermal installations have been a rare sight at Germany’s multi-family houses, the country’s Institute of New Energy Systems (InES) at the University of Applied Sciences in Ingolstadt took a closer look at Europe’s currently available larger solar thermal systems for domestic hot water and space heating. Daniel Beckenbauer, researcher at InES, counted 29 German collector installations above 100 m², as well as 47 systems in other European countries by surveying existing literature, web-based monitoring and other research programmes. Beckenbauer chose parameters such as solar share, investment costs and solar heat prices to compare these systems and to analyse the system designs offered on the market today. The chart above shows the monitored solar share based on the system’s specific storage volume. Because there are great differences in this volume between the surveyed projects, the x-axis has been divided logarithmically, spreading from 0.01 litre per MWh consumed heat per year (1E-05) to 100 m³ per MWh annually (1E+02).
Figures: Institute of New Energy Systems (InES)
 

Europe: Online Database on Large-Scale Solar Heating Plants

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 18, 2014
District Heating per CountryThe database on Europe’s largest solar heating plants, which can be found on the EU project SDHplus website, dates back to 1997. In the meantime, it has grown to 131 solar heating plants totalling a collector area of 586,000 m² (410 MWth). The first plants included in the database were installed in 1979. 124 of 131 systems are solar heating plants, most of them for district heating (particularly those in Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Austria, Poland and France), but also for large buildings, industrial use and other applications, whereas seven are cooling installations. The database contains "close to 100 % of all plants which have a minimum thermal output of 700 kW and started operating until the end of 2013,” says Jan-Olof Dalenbäck from the Chalmers University of Technology, who is in charge of updating the database as part of the SDHplus project. Eleven of these systems, with a joint output of 22 MW, have been shut down by now. The pie chart shows the installed collector area of district heating systems broken down by country.
Source: Database on SDHplus website
 

REN 21: Solar Thermal Contributes Significantly to Hot Water Production

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 30, 2014
top ten 2012According to REN21’s Renewables 2014 Global Status Report, which was published at the UN-hosted Sustainable Energy for All Forum in New York at the beginning of June, solar thermal technologies contribute significantly to hot water production in many countries and increasingly to space heating and cooling, as well as industrial processes. REN21 is a global multi-stakeholder network for renewable energy policy, connecting key actors from governments, international organisations, industry associations, science and academia, as well as civil society. First released in 2005, the report provides a comprehensive and timely overview of renewable energy markets, industries, investments and policy developments worldwide. The renewable energy data is provided by an international network of more than 500 contributors, researchers and authors. According to report data, the world added 55.4 GWth (more than 79 million m2) of solar heat capacity in 2012, increasing the cumulative installed capacity of all collector types in operation by over 14 % for a year-end total of 283.4 GWth. The chart above shows the shares in global capacity in operation across 2012’s top ten countries.
Source: Renewables 2014 Global Status Report
 

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