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Domestic Hot Water and Heating, Europe

IEA Medium-Term Report: Solar Heating and Cooling Not on Track for 2 °C Scenario

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 15, 2016
MTRMR 2016The IEA’s Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report or MTRMR 2016 again includes a chapter on renewable heating and cooling – and it’s growing in size. The 282-page document published from Singapore on 25 October analyses on 47 pages the current and future market development of four renewable heating technologies: biomass, solar thermal, geothermal and heat pumps. The IEA began to add a renewable heating chapter to its MTRMR in 2013 – back then, it had only 14 pages. The authors of this year’s edition emphasise the fact that onshore wind and solar PV are the only renewable technologies on track for a 2 °C target.
 

Solergy Collector Label: EU Commission Confirms Clear Distinction from Energy Labelling

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 28, 2015
The implementation of voluntary collector label Solergy will enter into the second phase in 2016. The European Commission has confirmed that there was no likelihood of confusing the voluntary mark with the official energy labelling stipulated since September 2015 for heating devices across Europe, the Steering Committee of the Solar Heating Initiative said in a letter sent to selected stakeholders in the middle of December. The letter went on to explain that it would now be the responsibility of DIN Certco, the German certification body, to issue Solergy labels officially and register the certificates in an online database. During the first phase in the second half of 2015, it had been Stefan Abrecht, the initiator of the voluntary collector label and General Manager of German company Solar Experience, who had issued the certificates.
 

Europe: Strategy on Heating and Cooling Launches in February 2016

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 21, 2015
Maroš Šefčovič (left) and Miguel Arias CañeteThe publication of the EU Strategy on Heating and Cooling (Heat Strategy) is now scheduled for February 2016, when it will be published as part of the winter (legislative) package comprising a revised Security of Gas Supply Regulation and an EU strategy for liquefied natural gas. The Heat Strategy was supposed to be already out on 18 November 2015. The consultation process is now over and the ENER C3 unit of the Directorate General (DG) of Energy is drafting the final version. The photos show the two most important heads of European energy strategies, both with a five-year term up to 2019: Maroš Šefčovič from Slovakia, Vice-President of the European Commission and in charge of the Energy Union (left), and Miguel Arias Cañete from Spain, the commissioner for Energy and Climate Action. 
Photos: EU Commission
 

European Energy Labelling: Solar Manufacturers Have Doubts

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 27, 2015
Solrico energy labellingThere is great scepticism among Europe’s solar thermal collector manufacturers about whether or not the energy labelling will increase demand for solar thermal systems. In a survey carried out by German agency solrico, more than 50 % of the European solar thermal manufacturers disagreed with the statement “The energy labelling will foster your solar sales”. All in all, 158 solar collector and solar tank manufacturers in Europe answered the multiple-choice question (Do you agree with the following statement – The energy labelling will foster your solar sales?) by ticking one of five answers: strongly agree, agree, tend to agree, disagree and strongly disagree. The chart shows the results at national level. The figures in brackets display the number of valid answers from each country.
Chart: solrico
 

Solar Water Heaters Not First Choice of EU-GUGLE Participants

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 15, 2015
Tampere Project FinnlandFinding feasible renovation models to change energy-consuming buildings into nearly zero-energy ones is the aim of the EU-GUGLE project, which stands for European cities serving as Green Urban Gate towards Leadership in sustainable Energy. The programme was launched at the six participating European cities of Aachen (Germany), Bratislava (Slovakia), Milan (Italy), Sestao (Spain), Tampere (Finland) and Vienna (Austria) in 2013. Each one of these cities agreed to renovate 226,000 m2 of living space over five years by increasing the share of renewable energy sources to 25 % in order to save between 40 % and 80 % of primary energy consumption with it. The photo shows the collector installation on the roof of a multi-family building in Tampere, one of the very few solar thermal installations in the EU project. 
Photo: Ecofellows
 

Experiences in Solar Water Heater Markets in Europe and Scope for Collaboration with India (2015)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on June 4, 2015

This document was presented by Gerhard Stryi-Hipp of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE at the RE-INVEST Conference held in New Delhi, India, on 17 February 2015.

Solar Days 2015: Individual Schedules in Eight Countries

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 31, 2015
LuftballonsThe European Solar Days (ESD) seem to have lost some momentum. Since the European Union stopped co-financing the ESD, it seems that several national partners among the so far more than 20 participating countries have found it harder to get monetary support for their work and all of the activities required for coordinating the Solar Days campaign at national level. Still, the European Solar Thermal Industry Federation (ESTIF) has been able to agree with several previously participating countries on a common schedule from 1 to 15 May. Austria, Switzerland, Norway, Poland and Serbia have already told ESTIF about their activities in May (see the table below). Belgium, Denmark, Slovenia and Spain, however, will not offer any solar days this year. The photo shows an event in an primary school in Switzerland
Photo: Scuola Elementare Canobbio
 

Construction of Solar Collectors for Warm Water – Practical Guide (2014)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on March 5, 2015

WECF,  Women of Europe for a Common Future, has published a practical guide explaining how to build a cheap and efficient solar water heating system, using local knowledge and materials and which can be used all year long. The document provides information on the different parts of a solar water heater, on how to build solar collectors and a heat exchanger tank.  It also gives further information on other solar water heater models.

Europe: Performance and Cost Comparisons of Larger Residential Solar Thermal Systems

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 2, 2014
As solar thermal installations have been a rare sight at Germany’s multi-family houses, the country’s Institute of New Energy Systems (InES) at the University of Applied Sciences in Ingolstadt took a closer look at Europe’s currently available larger solar thermal systems for domestic hot water and space heating. Daniel Beckenbauer, researcher at InES, counted 29 German collector installations above 100 m², as well as 47 systems in other European countries by surveying existing literature, web-based monitoring and other research programmes. Beckenbauer chose parameters such as solar share, investment costs and solar heat prices to compare these systems and to analyse the system designs offered on the market today. The chart above shows the monitored solar share based on the system’s specific storage volume. Because there are great differences in this volume between the surveyed projects, the x-axis has been divided logarithmically, spreading from 0.01 litre per MWh consumed heat per year (1E-05) to 100 m³ per MWh annually (1E+02).
Figures: Institute of New Energy Systems (InES)
 

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