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Molten Salt Storage

Tibet´s highly subsidised solar heating market

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 2, 2018
Tibet is currently in the focus of the Chinese central government’s efforts to improve the heating situation of the population. The lack of space heating in many buildings in the region, which is subject to a continental climate marked by cold winters, has prompted China’s government to support the installation of solar district heating systems. In addition to Chinese-Danish joint venture Arcon-Sunmark Large-Scale Solar Systems Integration, Chinese parabolic trough collector manufacturer Vicot Solar Technology has signed a contract with the local government to install a solar district heating system in the autonomous region of Tibet. The photo, taken in November 2017, shows one-third of the field’s substructure. The entire installation will have 18,000 m2 of aperture area which is defined as the flat, rectangular area specified by the outer perimeter of the mirrors.
Photo: Vicot Solar Technology
 

Molten salt storage 33 times cheaper than lithium-ion batteries

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 12, 2018
Cost-effective energy storage is key to transitioning to a low-carbon society. Energy can be stored in the form of heat or electricity. A popular storage method for high-temperature thermal applications is a molten salt tank. Fact sheets created by the German Energy Storage Association, or BVES for short, show that molten salt tanks are around 33 times less expensive than electric batteries when it comes to storing a kilowatt-hour in them. 
Image: Frenell
 

Zero Carbon Australia Stationary Energy Plan (2010)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on July 6, 2010

This is the synopsis of a report prepared by Beyond Zero Emissions and the Climate Emergency Network, with the support from Climate Positive. The final version of the report will be launched on 14 July 2010.

The Zero Carbon Australia 2020 project was conceived to develop a blueprint for the transition to a decarbonised Australian economy by 2020. Wind and Concentrating Solar Thermal (CST) with Molten Salt Storage are the two primary technologies used, with some backup from biomass and existing hydro.

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