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NREAP

Lebanon: On Track for 2020 Square-Metre Target of 1 Million

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 3, 2017
NREAP LebanonLebanon seems to be one of only a handful of countries that are on track for meeting their solar thermal targets. The market statistics from the Lebanese Centre for Energy Conservation (LCEC) show around 250,000 m² of collector area were installed between 2009 and 2014, which exceeded the government’s aim of 190,000 m² for the same period. The second target set in 2009 – a collector area of 1 million m² by 2020 – is just as realistic, LCEC confirmed in its recently published National Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP) for the Republic of Lebanon 2016-2020 (see the attached document). The chart shows an estimated market increase of 600,000 m² between 2016 and 2020. The LCEC researchers and authors of Lebanon’s second NREAP also underline the importance of continuing the country’s financing mechanism.
Figure: Chart from NREAP, p. 87
 

Macedonia: National Subsidy Budget Raise

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 14, 2017
Macedonia Incentive ProgrammeThe Republic of Macedonia has been in a state of political turmoil for some time. The most recent general election was held in December 2016, but it is still unclear whether a new government can be formed. Considering the circumstances, the provisional authorities have taken laudable steps to maintain a sense of continuity when it comes to national renewable energy policy. In late January, the Ministry of Economy extended the Programme for partial subsidising of purchased and installed solar thermal collectors in households. “This scheme has been a success since its implementation in 2007 and attracts broad interest,” the country’s economy minister, Driton Kuchi, explained on TV Nova on 7 February. Online news portal Tocka reports that between 2007 and 2016 (see the chart above), the programme supported 4,237 households with a total of Macedonian Denar (MKD) 54 million (around EUR 900,000).
 

Turkey: Great Achievements with Little Policy Support

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 5, 2015

The interest in technology and market research on the solar heating and cooling sector is growing. The number of countries participating in the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) increased significantly over the last two years from 20 to 25 nations. One of the most recent entries was Turkey in 2014, represented by GÜNDER, the Turkish Section of the International Solar Energy Society (ISES). Turkey is the second-largest market after China regarding new solar thermal installations and a gateway to the MENA region, SHC chairman Ken Guthrie praised the new member in a press release this February. Large-scale installations in prisons, hotels and social housing projects are gaining in volume (see photos). The majority of the 20 key solar thermal markets worldwide are now members of the IEA SHC except for India, Brazil, USA, Israel, Greece, Japan and Poland.
Photos: Günder

Solar Thermal Markets - On Track for 2020? (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on October 7, 2012

This presentation by ESTIF's Robin Welling - given at the  2012 Renewable and Cooling Platform - analyses 2011 statistics for the EU solar thermal market, in order to evaluate whether member states are collectively on track to meet their 2020 targets. Overall, the market levelled off in 2011, with all the major markets except Germany (which had +11% growth) experiencing a decrease in installed capacity.

Albania: New Draft Law to Support Solar Water Heating

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 20, 2012

Albania is taking further steps towards implementing the European Union’s legal framework in terms of solar water heating (SWH) systems. In May 2012, a round-table discussion on the new draft of Albania’s National Renewable Energy Action Plan (NREAP) and the draft law proposal on promoting SWH systems brought together experts in the field, investors, representatives of interest groups, and officials from the Albanian Ministry of Economy, Trade and Energy (METE), as well as the UNDP Climate Change Programme in Albania. UNDP’s Project Leader in Albania, Mirela Kamberi, believes that the “RES law will get approved by the end of 2012”. Some uncertainty, however, remains because the Renewable Energy Sources (RES) law will go to Parliament as part of a package of four laws. Two of these, such as the Law on Power Sector and the amendment of the existing Law on Concessions, deal with rather sensitive issues.
Photo: UNDP Albania

Hungary: Great Interest in Expired Residential Subsidy Scheme

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 13, 2012

 Hungarian Ministry of National Development” The Hungarian Ministry of National Development reported a high interest in one of its recently halted support programmes. According to the ministry’s statement from 17 May, it received 5,686 applications for the "Sub programme to set up solar collector systems that facilitate the use of renewable energies, generate residential hot water and provide space heating”. The ministry also stated that 2,300 of these applications have already been approved: “The total amount requested in the applications reaches the Hungarian Forint (HUF) 2.97 billion (EUR 10 million) available.” The sub programme was launched at the beginning of October 2011 and expired - after several extensions - on 15 May 2012.

Poland: Draft of Renewable Energy Sources Law

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 23, 2012

 Polish Governmental and Diplomatic Plaque On 22 December 2011, the Polish Ministry of Economy presented the draft of a new Renewable Energy Sources Law. It includes a renewable building obligation for the private and public sector, as well as a one-time tax deduction for private solar thermal customers (in addition to the grants offered by the Polish National Fund for Environmental Protection and Water Management, NFOŚiGW). The new regulations are thought to boost the Polish solar thermal market in the long term. At first, the RES Law was said to be introduced on July 1, 2012. However, delays in legislative procedures will most likely postpone the new regulations to later this year, so that they are going to take full effect in 2013.
Source: Wikipedia

Renewable Energy Projects as Published in the National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the EU Member States (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on September 14, 2011

This report, compiled by the Energy Research Centre from the Netherlands with the help of the European Environment Agency, has been published in February 2011 and illustrates the targeted levels of renewable energy production that the EU member-states want to obtain by 2020.

Portugal: Market Players facing Serious Problems

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 8, 2011

Two months after the new government came to power, its strategy for solar energy still remains a mystery: The new subsidy programme barely mentions renewable energies, but focuses on energy efficiency instead. Last year's two subsidy schemes for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), as well as Private Social Solidarity Institutions (IPSS) and sports facilities have also stopped. And, the tax rebates of roughly EUR 800 for residential clients who purchase renewable energies equipment have no longer been in place since an agreement of the government with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). At present, buyers of solar water heaters can only declare a limited amount as a tax benefit, which means a much smaller savings effect.

Poland: “Wind of change” blowing for Solar Thermal

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 24, 2011

 Installed Collector Area in Poland” While in most of Europe the solar heating and cooling market has been suffering from a decline in sales since 2009, Poland has experienced a slight growth in its national industry. According to data gathered by ESTIF (European Solar Thermal Industry Federation), Poland was the 8th largest market for solar collectors in 2010. It has not had significant lows in newly installed collector area since 2000, but still needs a big jump forward to reach the target of 20 million m2 in 2020 (see chart). Solarthermalworld.org talked to Janusz Starościk, head of the Polish heating organisation SPIUG, which has made the push for solar energy part of its agenda.
Source: IEO EC BREC

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