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multi-family-houses

“We cannot predict market development, because we live in the Ukraine“

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 4, 2013

The Ukrainian solar thermal market is extremely price-sensitive. Whereas importers of Chinese vacuum tube collectors have increased their annual sales significantly, the demand for high-quality solar collectors is stagnating. This is one of the results of the annual ISOL Navigator survey by German agency solrico and the follow-up interviews with local market players. Single-family houses and the tourism sector have the highest share in the sales of the companies that participated in the survey (see the chart on the left). Solar thermal systems for multi-family houses will gain importance, as already every fifth company considers it the fastest-growing segment in the Ukraine. After all, the industry complains that most support mechanisms will not be effective because of the high level of corruption across the country.
Figure: solrico

Germany: Housing Coop’s Monitored Solar Plants Achieve 500 kWh/m²

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 22, 2013

German company Parabel Energiesysteme has set up solar thermal systems with collector areas between 20 and 220 m² on, all in all, 450 buildings across Europe. More than 100 of these systems are part of a continuous monitoring programme. Their typical yield is 500 kWh/m² and year – impressively high for Germany. In January, a group of participants of the SMEThermal conference in Berlin, Germany, took a tour to a Parabel plant. The photo shows the area in the centre of Berlin where solar water heaters are placed on several roofs of the multi-family buildings as well as a kindergarten on the left.
Photo: Eva Augsten

France: Influence of New Building Standards in 2013

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 19, 2012

The solar thermal industry in France looks with mixed feelings to next year. Certain system suppliers are convinced that the French building regulation RT2012 will push solar water heaters in the residential segment in 2013. In contrast, others are afraid that hot water heat pumps will make the race because electricity prices are still low and the heat pump lobby is well represented across the country. Together with the low-energy building label BBC, the previous RT2005 regulation have proven to be rather successful in the last three years and especially in 2012 with regard to solar thermal systems in multi-family houses. It is still unclear how the new regulation RT2012 will affect the implementation of this technology. The chart shows the steps that have been taken to ensure a zero-energy or energy-positive housing standard in new buildings in 2020.
Chart: homeenergypros.lbl.gov

Turkey: High-quality Solar Hot Water Systems across Earthquake Area

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 26, 2012

One year after the earthquake in the city of Van in the very east of Turkey, the government has built more than 15,000 new houses for those who lost their homes. The 15,323 new flats were constructed within twelve months. All of them are equipped with individual 120 litre thermosiphon solar water heaters, corresponding to a total collector area of 30,646 m2.
Photo: Ezinç

China: Beijing Mandates Solar Hot Water Systems

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 23, 2012

 Solar thermal systems in Beijing On 1 March 2012, Beijing followed many other large Chinese cities in introducing its own solar thermal mandatory law. The new regulations are stipulated in document No. 3/2012, “Beijing Urban Construction Applications Management Approach”. Article 9 describes the scope of the new regulations: Newly built residential houses of up to 12 floor - as well as hotels, schools, hospitals, and swimming pools - are obliged to install a solar thermal hot water system if no waste heat is used to cover domestic hot water demand. The photo shows a block of flats in the city of Jinan, 400 km southeast of Beijing, in which a solar obligation has already been in place for several years.
Photo: Bärbel Epp

Brazil: Solar Water Heater Case Studies in Multi-family Housing

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 22, 2012

 Multi-family buildings in Brazil In cooperation with engineering office SE-Studio Equinócio, the International Copper Association (ICA) Latin America has released a publication which highlights the use of solar heating in large residential buildings. Three installations that have been monitored for several years show the economic, environmental and operational results of solar hot water use. The main conclusion: Solar heating reduces gas consumption by between 30% and 50% and pays back in less than four years (see the attached PDF in Portuguese).
Photo: ICA

Tunisia: PROSOL Subsidises 4,000 m² of Commercial Installations

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 29, 2011

 Solar installation on the Iberostar Phenicia hotel in Hammamet The “Collective Prosol Programme” in Tunisia is gaining momentum. The National Agency for Energy Conservation (ANME) started the subsidy programme for solar thermal installations in the tertiary sector back in 2008. The application rate was low at first, but 2010 became a good year for the commercial solar thermal market. At the end of that year, ANME counted a total installed and subsidised collector area of 4,000 m2, including four hotel installations with together 480 m2 and around 130 smaller installations under 30 m2. According to ANME, grants for another 1,770 m2 are still in the pipeline. And, a solar programme targeting 18 public swimming pools is also under development. The photo shows the solar installation on the Iberostar Phenicia hotel in Hammamet, at the northeast coast of Tunisia.
Photo: Alcor

Brazil: New Requirements for Solar Installations on Social Housing

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 23, 2011

 My Home My Life programmeThe Brazilian social housing programme 'My Home My Life' has now entered its second phase (2011/2014). Despite new rules, installing a solar water heater remains mandatory for all single-family houses whose owners have a wage lower than Brazilian Real (BRL) 1,600. The sector had to wait until 27 September for the government-owned bank CAIXA to release the technical requirements for solar thermal systems. Now, the new projects are ready to begin. Each solar water system, including installation, is subsidised with up to 2,000 BRL/residential unit. For newly built multi-family houses, the low-income solar system is optional.
Source: EPA

UAE: Large-scale Solar Thermal Systems directly at the beach

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 31, 2011

 Multi-storey buildings on “The Palm Jumeirah”” The first large solar thermal project of Viessmann in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has already been in operation for four years, and has not experienced any major technical problems during that time. In 2007, the German heating boiler manufacturer delivered and installed 3,000 m2 of flat plate collectors, type Vitosol 200 F, which provide a daily supply of 20,000 litres of hot water to multi-storey buildings on “The Palm Jumeirah” near Dubai, UAE. The collector fields were installed on the roofs of the 14 flat blocks situated directly at the beach of the Arabian Gulf. Backup heat is generated by wall-hung gas boilers.
Photo: Viessmann

Long-term Trend in Austria: Combi Systems in retrofitted Houses

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 27, 2011

 Share of combi systems ” Austrian flat plate collector manufacturers may smile again: Last year's decline seems to have been overcome. A quarterly anonymous survey carried out by an Austrian accounting company among 25 members of the solar thermal industry association Austria Solar (representing 75 % of the total market volume) showed an increase in sales of 22 % in the first quarter of 2011, compared to the previous weak year. The annual market statistics carried out by the Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (BMVIT) also show several other interesting trends, such as the one towards combi systems (see figure).
Figure: BMVIT/Austria Solar

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