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United Nations Environment Programme

Tunisia: National Subsidy Scheme Prosol Extended to 2020

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 3, 2017
Tunisian Market DevelopmentTunisia`s solar thermal market stabilised at 64,000 m2 in 2016, a figure only slightly lower than the 65,000 m2 in 2015 and in 2014, but significantly below the peak years of 2008 to 2010. The key market driver had again been Prosol, the national residential programme launched in 2005 and based on a financial scheme combining direct subsidies of Tunisian Dinar (TND) 200 and 300 granted by the Energy Transition Fund and low-interest loans. With 90 %, residential systems still account for the largest share in newly installed collector area. However, hotels and commercial buildings have profited from Prosol Tertiary since 2009 and contributed around 5 %.
Graphic: Alcor
 

Integrating Solar Thermal in Buildings – A quick guide for Architects and Builders

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on February 5, 2015

This guide for Architects and Builders aims at promoting SWH systems to architects and builders from developing countries and help them consider integrating SWH applications in their designs and projects. Intending to be a useful handbook, this “Guide” provides a compact overview of the technology and its main characteristics; as well as the main requirements to be considered for its application in different types of construction projects and in different geographical locations.

It was elaborated in order to increase awareness about SWH among important stakeholders, such as architects and builders; and encourage the use of this type of solar systems. Hence, it gives a synopsis of the technology and general requirements for integration in buildings. 

Guidebook for the Development of a Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action for Solar Water Heaters

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on October 13, 2014

Reflecting the changing balance in global greenhouse gas emissions, NAMAs embody the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. In addition to developed countries’ commitments to make quantitative reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, developing countries are invited to contribute with voluntary actions that are ‘nationally appropriate’ deviations from ‘business as usual’ emissions scenarios. Such deviations may be captured in low-carbon (or low-emission) development strategies, and then implemented as NAMAs

This guidebook provides an introduction to designing government-led interventions to scale up investment in solar water heating (SWH) markets, showing how these interventions can be packaged as Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAS).

Reflecting the changing balance in global greenhouse gas emissions, NAMAs embody the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. In addition to developed countries’ commitments to make quantitative reductions of greenhouse gas emissions, developing countries are invited to contribute with voluntary actions that are ‘nationally appropriate’ deviations from ‘business as usual’ emissions scenarios. Such deviations may be captured in low-carbon (or low-emission) development strategies, and then implemented as NAMAs.

Study on Good Practices for Solar Water Heating in Multifamily Housing

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on September 22, 2014

This study analyses technological and social barriers against the use of solar water heating (SWH) systems and compile the best practice to select and take decisions on the design of a SWH system. Possible barriers are divided into 5 groups (hydraulic installations, entitlement to sunshine, current regulation, community collaboration, new businesses), as well as best practice (concept selection, equipment selection, control systems, operation and maintenance, general considerations).

The study highlights how the main barriers to the development of SWH are social, while aware community collaboration is fundamental for the best use of SWH systems.

Technical Guide for Architects and Designers: Centralized Systems for Multi-Family Houses- Chile

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on September 19, 2014

This technical guide provides explanations for architects and designers on the preparation and installation of centralized solar thermal systems in multi-family houses. It also investigates the architectural conditions, technical variables and minimum technical specifications required for the correct installation of a centralised solar thermal water heating the system. The document includes a glossary providing explanation on different terms and techniques. 

Albania: UNDP/UNEP Regional Workshop Illustrates Showcases in the Region

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 3, 2013

 

Around 30 solar thermal experts from 14 different Mediterranean countries met in Albania on 20/21 March 2013 to discuss strategies for market development. “The target of the workshop was to share knowledge among key experts from both the public and private sectors regarding best practice and deployment strategies in this region,” explains Amr Abdelhai, Project Coordinator at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The two-day workshop was part of the Global Solar Water Heating Market Transformation and Strengthening Initiative (GSWH) and was organised by Observatoire Méditerranéen de l'Energie (OME) one of the regional partners of this initiative. The photo shows the visit to the orphan house in Tirana, Albania, at which a 20 m² solar thermal collector field supports domestic hot water and space heating.
Photo: Bärbel Epp

Europe: 3,000 m² Collector Area at Three STACCATO Projects

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 12, 2012

What do the European capitals Amsterdam, Budapest and Sofia have in common? Not much, except that they have all been participating in the STACCATO project since November 2007. The project is a sub-programme of the European Commission’s CONCERTO initiative to promote energy efficiency and renewable energies. The STACCATO retrofit projects in Sofia-Oborishte (see photo), Amsterdam-Noord and Budapest-Óbuda are to achieve four specified goals: reduce energy consumption by more than half, integrate renewable - mainly solar thermal - energy on a large scale, make district heating compatible with modern energy systems and, last but not least, build up capacity for follow-up projects. Until now, the three STACCATO demonstration sites have seen the installation of about 3,000 m² of solar collector area.
Photo: Frank Stier

Tunisia: PROSOL Subsidises 4,000 m² of Commercial Installations

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 29, 2011

 Solar installation on the Iberostar Phenicia hotel in Hammamet The “Collective Prosol Programme” in Tunisia is gaining momentum. The National Agency for Energy Conservation (ANME) started the subsidy programme for solar thermal installations in the tertiary sector back in 2008. The application rate was low at first, but 2010 became a good year for the commercial solar thermal market. At the end of that year, ANME counted a total installed and subsidised collector area of 4,000 m2, including four hotel installations with together 480 m2 and around 130 smaller installations under 30 m2. According to ANME, grants for another 1,770 m2 are still in the pipeline. And, a solar programme targeting 18 public swimming pools is also under development. The photo shows the solar installation on the Iberostar Phenicia hotel in Hammamet, at the northeast coast of Tunisia.
Photo: Alcor

Presentation on Chile’s National Programme in the Framework of the GSWH Market Transformation and Stregthening Initiative (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on October 12, 2011

This is a presentation delivered by Programa Solar during a regional workshop on the use of solar thermal technologies in Latin America and the Caribbean, organized by the Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) in the framework of its cooperation with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

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