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latent heat storage

IEA SHC Task 42: Latent Heat Storage Has Huge Potential in the Long Run

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 25, 2015
IEA SHC Task 42In their position paper published in August 2015, the scientists of IEA SHC Task 42 (Compact Thermal Energy Storage) summed up the key results of their work between 2009 and 2015. Operating agent Matthias Rommel sees huge potential for latent heat and sorption materials in the long run – in seasonal solar heat storage for small and medium applications, as well as in the building sector. So-called smart grids will also require more heat storage units when devices such as heat pumps and co-generation plants are based on electricity grid requirements. Rommel views the definition of measurement standards for PCM materials as one of the task’s big achievements, which will help in material development. Furthermore, a research group from German research institute ZAE Bayern has performed a first cost estimate of compact heat storage technologies.  
 

Germany: Solar + Heat Pump + Ice Storage Achieves Seasonal Performance Factor of 5.6

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 22, 2015
Ice storage ConsalarGerman company Consolar offers a heating system called SOLAERA, which combines a heat pump with a specially designed solar collector and a heat storage space using the latent heat released when water freezes to ice (see photo). The solar heat pump system with 18 m² of collector area, a 300 litre ice storage space and a 1,000 litre buffer tank provides enough energy to heat a well-insulated building in Germany. In a field test by a local environment group, Lokale Agenda 21, it achieved a Seasonal Performance Factor (SPF) of 5.6, putting performance even above prior simulations. The SPF describes the ratio of delivered heat to electricity consumed over the entire year. Consolar sold about 160 solar heat pump systems in total, mostly in Germany but also in Denmark, the UK, Switzerland, Belgium, France and Italy. The systems there achieved SPFs between 3.5 and 6, depending on collector field size, maximum flow temperature and heat demand.
Photo: Consolar
 

Germany: ISH 2015 and Its Prominent Novelties

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 30, 2015
KiotoManagers from four different companies showcasing one innovation – a rare occurrence, even at a large fair like the ISH 2015 in Frankfurt. At the beginning of March, Rudolf Pfeil, CEO of Resol, Christian Beckmann, Sales Manager Key Account and OEM at Wilo, Günter Kohlmaier, CEO of Kioto Solar, and Karsten Pillukeit, CEO of Esbe Group (from left), jointly presented the newly developed fresh water module, Fresh Hydro, at the booth of Kioto Solar. Thanks to a patented temperature control, the fresh water module offers rapid response times without over- or undershooting. The developers have promised a comfortable showering experience at 40 to 160 litres per minute and a temperature of 45 °C. The fresh water system was one of a number of solar thermal innovations at the ISH which were worth taking a closer look.
Photo: Sun & Wind Energy / Tanja Peschel 
 

Germany: H.M. Heizkörper Plans to Mass-Produce Latent Heat Storage Units

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 13, 2014
ThermobatterieThe Thermobatterie (English: thermal battery), a latent heat storage unit by German manufacturer H.M. Heizkörper, makes it possible to absorb generated thermal energy and store up to two-thirds of it as latent heat without time restraints or heat losses. If required, the energy can later be released in suitable amounts and used in different application areas. The other third of the absorbed thermal energy will be stored conventionally as sensible heat, meaning heat that can be felt physically. solarthermalworld.org spoke with Project Manager Michael Sigwanz about the battery’s market potential and target groups and the advantages of a modular design. The photo shows the Thermobatterie in a single-family-house in Büttstedt, Germany. 
Photo: H.M. Heizkörper
 

SMEThermal 2014: “The challenge is the energy storage”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 2, 2014
latent heat storageLarge storage capacity, modular design, high storage density and low heat losses: These are the current requirements for solar thermal heat storage. The result is that hot water storage products are often stretched to their limits. Alternatives could be phase change materials (PCMs) or thermo-chemical materials (TCMs). During the SMEThermal 2014 conference in Berlin, Dr Henner Kerskes, Research Associate at the Research and Testing Centre for Thermal Solar Systems, TZS, of the University of Stuttgart, Germany, and Monte C Magill, Business Development Director at US company Entropy Solutions, explained the design, operation and possibilities of latent heat and thermo-chemical energy storage solutions (see the attached documents).
Photos: Stephanie Banse
 

Ventilation Performance of Solar Chimney with Built-in Latent Heat Storage (2006)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on March 12, 2010

This document was prepared by two researchers from the Osaka University, Department of Architectural Engineering. It describes the prototype solar chimney with PCM (Phase Change Material) storage, together with a numerical model for predicting air flow rate in a solar chimney and temperature of aluminum plate, air and PCM.

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