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Renewable Heat Incentive

UK: How Does Solar Thermal Sustain against Photovoltaics and Biomass?

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 30, 2017
KingspanAt the end of 2016 the solar thermal industry association STA campaigned successfully for solar thermal to remain in the two Renewable Heat Incentives (RHI). However, the year 2017 was so far weaker than the previous years. In the domestic RHI there were 423 residential applications accredited from January to September 2017, compared to 537 in the same period of the previous year. Approved applications for commercial solar thermal plants with in the non-domestic RHI were down to 19 in this same period from 36 in the previous year.  The photo shows a 155 m² installation on the roof of the new Star Community Centre in Cardiff that opened its doors in September 2016. 
Photo: Kingspan
 

Great Britain: Solar thermal proposed to exit the Renewable Heat Incentive scheme

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 8, 2016
The previously reported rumours of significant changes for solar thermal support in the UK have now been confirmed by the government in a consultation proposal on 3 March. Already we knew the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) in Northern Ireland is suspended to all new renewable technologies. We now also know for new solar thermal systems in the rest of the UK that RHI support is proposed to be removed in 2017. This is for both RHI schemes domestic and non-domestic. The details have been released under the consultation document ‘The Renewable Heat Incentive: A reformed and refocused scheme’ (see attached pdf). The industry can comment to this consultation before the 27th April 2016. Already on the same day the Solar Trade Association (STA) published a protest note titled: British manufacturers and social housing providers join call for urgent rethink.

Great Britain: Performance of the two UK Renewable Heat Incentive Schemes

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 3, 2014
UK RHI statisticsThe UK has two Renewable Heat Incentives (RHI) that assist solar thermal. The non-domestic variant (non-dRHI) has operated since November 2011. The variant for households (dRHI) has operated since April 2014. Whereas the share of solar thermal applications within the non-DRHI is still low with 3 % (left chart), every fifth new domestic renewable heating system contains a solar water heater (right chart). For solar thermal, the non-dRHI currently pays 0.10 GBP/kWh for 20 years and the dRHI currently pays the end-user tariff at a rate of 0.192 Pound Sterling (GBP)/kWh for 7 years. Both rates will be annually adjusted for inflation through the payment period. The pie charts show the numbers of accreditations of non-dRHI and dRHI technologies. 
Source: Gas and Electricity Markets Authority (Ofgem)
 

Great Britain: Can the UK solar thermal market recover from its terminal decline?

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 4, 2013

For almost a year now, the UK government has been recording statistics on all the subsidised renewable heating and electricity installations. It is now possible to compare the success of the subsidies for different technologies using the peak power rating. The chart shows the cumulative peak power for non-household projects within the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). Solar thermal has had a poor performance with only 1 MW installed capacity since 2010, which represents less than 1 % of all RHI-subsidised renewable heat installations. This is no surprise because the number of UK sales by square metre of collector area has been in decline since mid-2011.
Source: Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

UK: More Good than Bad News from the British Islands

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 2, 2013

In March 2013, the UK Government came under criticism for their updated heat strategy when they announced further delays to the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) being made applicable to householders. As a stop-gap, it was announced in parallel to extend the householder’s Renewable Heat Premium Payment (RHPP) scheme for another year. In summary, much of the uncertainty about these schemes has been blamed for a 35% drop in UK solar thermal sales. Since then, better news has been offered by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC).

Scotland: “More Needs to be Done to Highlight the Benefits of Solar Thermal”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 17, 2013

In 2009 The Scottish Government instigated the Community and Renewable Energy Scheme (CARES). This originally provided funding for renewable projects including solar thermal projects when they were associated with not-for-profit communities. In March 2011 this scheme underwent a change due to the conditions that applied to the national renewable energy tariffs especially the Renewable Heat Incentive and the Feed-In tariff. Essentially now the decision for the communities became either to accept only a grant from CARES without the tariffs or find the capital funding without a grant and enjoy a long-term return from the tariffs. So the result became that only very few projects wanted to miss out on the tariffs and solar thermal applications are no longer benefitting much under the main CARES scheme. Although solar thermal had been reasonably popular in the first phase of the CARES scheme with solar thermal systems completed up to 2011 such as in schools and community centres, 2012 saw no applications for solar thermal plants within the new scheme.

Great Britain: Insolvency of Collector Manufacturer after the PV Crash

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 21, 2012

 Filsol Website ” Solar thermal companies in the UK are going through a difficult period, with some well-known solar thermal system providers no longer trading. One such company has been Filsol Ltd., a collector manufacturer founded in 1981. Solarthermalworld.org spoke with John Blower, who was the Managing Director of Filsol Limited but is now Managing Director of Mint Renewables. Blower was also a previous chairman of the UK Solar Trade Association (STA). The text above shows up on the former Filsol website pointing out that Tomorrow´s Energy bought some of the Filsol´s assets.
Source: http://www.tomorrowsenergy.co.uk/

Great Britain: Second Phase of the Interim Payment for Residential Clients

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 19, 2012

 Number of granted solar thermal installations ” The start of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) for British home owners has been officially postponed to summer 2013. To fill the gap, the UK’s Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) started the second phase of its interim one-off payment – called the Renewable Heat Premium Payment Scheme (RHPP) – on 1st May 2012, and published the results of Phase One which closed in March 2012. The chart above shows the number of subsidised solar water heaters per region. Altogether, 1,706 solar thermal systems were granted in the first phase of the RHPP.
Source: DECC

Howard Johns Speaks About the UK Grant Schemes

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 20, 2012

In this interview, Howard Johns, from Southern Solar, speaks about the UK Solar Trade Association and the different grant schemes in the UK like the renewable heat incentive, the green deal, among other.

Please visit our YouTube Channel for more Solarthermalworld.org Interviews

Review of Technical Information on Renewable Heat Technologies (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on December 27, 2011

The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change commissioned this report to the consultancy AEA Technology.

The report analyses the technical costs of four heating technologies: air source heat pumps (ASHP); ground source heat pumps (GSHP); solar thermal and biomass.

The objective is to better understand these technologies in order to prepare the review process of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme. The Renewable Heat Incentive went live in 2010 and it should be reviewed every four years.

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