You are here

Uruguay

Uruguay: The Battle for Market Growth Continues

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 23, 2015
Uruguay market developmentUruguay, whose population of 3.4 million makes it one of the smallest countries in Latin America, has shown positive market development since 2007. Cumulated installed solar thermal power saw a notable increase from 1 to 9.5 kWth per 1,000 inhabitants. According to numbers published by the National Energy Department and the annual national energy report, the country’s total collector area installed by the end of 2014 amounted to 46,241 m². Mesa Solar, the multi-sector network for the promotion of solar energy in Uruguay calls for accelerated growth to achieve 1 million m² in 2020. The official target of the government is 150,000 m² until 2024.
Source: Construcción y operación de Bancos ensayo de Solar Térmica en Uruguay, presentation held in San José, Costa Rica, on 29 June 2015
 

Latin America on Its Way to Solar Thermal Quality Standards

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 31, 2015
Costa Rica WorkshopBrazil is going to implement compulsory certification of solar water heating (SWH) equipment in 2015. Uruguay, Argentina, Chile and Mexico already have laboratories for testing, and Costa Rica has recently set up one. Latin America is working through the regional Pan American Standards Commission, COPANT, on regional standards for SWHs, with the aim of harmonising them with ISO standards. The region is not yet considering a common regional testing and certification scheme, but there is a growing consciousness of the fact that testing and certification performance, as well as quality is very important to developing the SWH markets of the region. It is the reason why 50 experts from 14 countries have recently discussed how to accelerate the process: The Regional Forum (from 29 to 30 June 2015) was jointly organised by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the project “Quality Infrastructure for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)” coordinated by the National Metrology Institute of Germany, PTB, the Latin American Energy Organization, OLADE, the Electricity Institute of Costa Rica, ICE, and the National Standards Body of Costa Rica, INTECO. All presentations are available for download on the IRENA website.
Photo: IRENA
 

Uruguay: New Regulations for Solar Housing Projects

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 23, 2015
Uruguay regulatiosUruguay took the next step towards a sunny future for the country. With the approval of the new regulation for the promotion of social housing projects, which entered into force on 16 June 2014, the Uruguayan Ministry of Housing, Land Use Planning and Environment, MVOTMA, stipulated that private investors in social housing projects can only receive the tax credits offered in law no. 18.795 from August 2011 if they install pipes and structures required for setting up a solar water heater later. Since June, solar thermal systems and their pre-installation requirements have received much more attention from architects, and solar thermal specialists see increasing demand for their engineering and design solutions. 
 

Uruguay: New Solar Thermal Regulations

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 3, 2014
Uruguay regulatiosSince 14 May 2014, Uruguay has had technical specifications for solar thermal installations. It was on this very day that the Ministry of Energy, Industry and Mines approved the first edition of the Especificaciones Técnicas Uruguayas (ETUS), the Uruguayan Technical Specifications for all registered solar thermal installations in the country. These requirements are obligatory for all public buildings and all public enterprises, such as the state energy utility UTE, the National Administration of Telecommunications, ANTEL, and state-owned oil, cement and gas supplier ANCAP, as well as for residential installations by homeowners or solar systems at private companies, such as hotels or hospitals. The photo shows a thermosiphon system which was installed under the requirements of Mesa Solar which includes the same requirements as ETUS for thermosiphon systems.
Photo: Eliseo Cabrera
 

Uruguay: Raising Awareness and Quality

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 3, 2014
Uruguay Solar InstallationUruguay’s solar thermal market is growing slowly, but it is growing – thanks to a residential subsidy scheme and a government decree. The scheme, which started in March 2012, has so far subsidised a solar water heater in almost 1,000 households with between 40 and 70% of the investment costs. The decree, Decreto No 451/011, stipulates a 50% solar hot water share in sport clubs, hospitals and hotels for both newly built and soon-to-be-renovated buildings, a move that has already helped to install several larger systems. The photos show a case study of a larger system installed on the roof of the Lawn Tennis Club in Montevideo. The flat plate collectors from company Alejandro Baroni were manufactured locally. 
Photos: Andrés Eliseo Cabrera
 

Argentina: Other Municipalities Follow Frontrunner City Rosario

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 7, 2013

Two years after the approval of the first local ordinance making it obligatory to install solar thermal systems in Rosario, Argentina, the regulation entered into force in September 2012 (see the attached document). Since then, all public buildings in the city have had to cover at least 50 % of their hot water consumption through solar energy. Ordinance 8784 could set an example for other cities in Argentina. Red de Ciudades Solares (Solar City Network) is lobbying to adopt the measure in several other municipalities and has even proposed a nationwide regulation.

Database of Building Codes: 24 Individual Regulations

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 25, 2013

Sometimes, it takes a while until good ideas are copied. This has been the case with solar/renewable building codes, which were invented in Israel more than 30 years ago. It has just been over the last ten years, however, that this political instrument reached all five continents. Frontrunner in Europe was Spain, which approved the Technical Building Code, CTE, in March 2006. It stipulates that new residential buildings and those undergoing major renovation must cover 30 to 70 % of their hot water demand by renewable energies. Outside Europe, it was the Australian state of Victoria which, in 2005, implemented the first building standard after Israel had done so two decades earlier. Israel’s building code lets private homeowners choose between two options - a solar water heater or a rainwater tank - in case of newly built houses and major renovations. In the meantime, the database of solar obligations on solarthermalworld.org has grown further and now includes 24 countries which use one of the various types of solar or renewable building codes. You will find the database by filtering on --> policy --> obligation.
Source: solrico

Uruguay: Growing at Its Own Pace

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 15, 2013

Uruguay’s government aims at reaching a renewable share of 50% in its national energy mix by 2015. In order to achieve this target, the government approved the so-called Solar Plan in March 2012. It offers up to USD 800 per solar thermal system to clients of the main public utility UTE. UTE reduces the energy bill of any SWH purchaser Uruguayan Peso (UYU) 700 over the first 24 months (UYU 16,800 = USD 800). In addition, the new Decreto No 451/011 mandates a 50 % solar share for hot water generation in hospitals, hotels and sports clubs – for both newly built and soon-to-be-renovated houses. However, some industry actors did not see a dramatic growth in solar thermal installations. Despite a lack of official statistics, one figure is clear: The subsidy scheme offers a budget for 2,000 systems, out of which 600 were already completed between March 2012 and July 2013.

Uruguay: FUCO Produces Flat Plate Collectors in Montevideo

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 22, 2012

It has been one year since FUCO (Fábrica Uruguaya de Colectores Solares Planos) started its production of flat plate collectors in the Uruguayan capital of Montevideo. Right now, the monthly output is at 800 m² and can be increased if necessary, says Director Daniel Sztern. Sztern is also Director of Enviro Consultores, a consulting company carrying out environmental studies and overseeing project development. Following a two-year study by Enviro about sustainable energy sources in Uruguay, Sztern decided to establish a factory for flat plate solar thermal collectors in the country.
Photo: FUCO

Uruguay: Solar Plan Includes Grants and Low-interest Loans for Households

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 14, 2012

 Roberto Kreimerman (left) ” The Government of the Republic of Uruguay aims at reaching a renewable share of 50 % in its national energy mix in 2015. The new Decreto N 451/011, which was implemented on 19 December 2011, marks an important step in this direction (see the attached document). The regulation refers to Solar Thermal Law 18585 (Ley Solar Tèrmica 18585), which was approved by the parliament on 18 September 2009. The new Decreto mandates a 50 % solar share for hot water generation in hospitals, hotels and sports clubs – for both newly built and soon-to-be-renovated houses. On 22 March 2012, the Minister of Industry, Energy and Mining, Roberto Kreimerman (see photo left), also launched a Solar Plan, which is hoped to increase the use of solar thermal collectors in private homes.
Source: Presidencia de la República Oriental del Uruguay

Pages

Search results

  • Country : Uruguay