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Washington D.C.

USA: Still no Solar Water Heaters on the White House

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 20, 2011

 In summer 2010, three students from Maine brought one of Carter’s old solar collectors back from Maine to Washington” In October 2010, US Energy Secretary Steven Chu and CEQ Chair Nancy Sutley announced plans to install solar PV panels and a solar water heater on the White House by spring 2011. Until now, however, none of the systems has found its way on the President's roof. And, the Department of Energy has refrained from making any more commitments regarding the time schedule. “Meet Your Solar Deadline,” reminds the initiative 350.org the USA administration and continues collecting signatures for a petition through its website act.350.org/sign/solar/.
Photo: 350.org

Maryland/USA: Solar Water Heaters eligible for Solar Renewable Energy Credits

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 27, 2011

 Maryland” Successful at second try: At the beginning of April, the government of the East Coast state of Maryland approved a bill which makes solar water heating eligible for Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs) under the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). So far, only solar electricity kilowatt-hours were accepted in fulfilling the solar quota of 2 % by 2022. In 2010, a similar bill fell short of success in the House of Delegates. Its passing half a year later came about due to the fervent lobbying efforts by members of the solar thermal sector, such as Rick Peters, President of Maryland-based installation company Solar Energy Services, and Mike Healy, Partner of installation company Skyline Innovations from Washington DC.
Figure: Wikipedia

USA: Solar Thermal SRECs traded in Washington D.C. and North Carolina

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 27, 2011

 RPS Policies with Solar/DG Provisions” More and more state governments in the USA approve Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) with a certain share of solar energy. An RPS requires utilities to retrieve a certain percentage from renewable sources every year. For example, in the District of Columbo (D.C.), utilities will have to get 20 % of their energy from renewable sources, with 0.4 % of that from solar. The map shows all states with an RPS policy including solar or Distributed Generation (DG).
Figure: dsireusa.org

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