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Hawaii

USA: Extended Tax Credits for Weak Solar Thermal Market

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 24, 2016
CalseiaAgainst all odds, the solar heating tax credits in the USA were extended again by 5 years. On 18 December 2015, the Consolidated Appropriations Act was signed, including an extension of the so-called federal Investment Tax Credits up to 2021. Originally, the tax incentives were expected to end on 31 December 2016 after an eleven-year period since 2005, with one previous extension in 2008. They allow both residential and commercial investors of solar PV and solar thermal systems to deduct 30 % of the investment costs at the next tax declaration.
Photo: Calseia.org

Hawaii/California: Sopogy Goes into Liquidation after More than a Decade in Business

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 7, 2014
After the Hawaiian manufacturer of parabolic trough systems, Sopogy, has stopped operations, its assets are now being liquidated as well. According to Pacific Business News (PBN), an attorney based in Los Angeles is handling the insolvency proceedings. While the PBN news piece was published in April 2014, Sopogy’s main phone line had already been out of service when German agency solrico carried out its research for the World Map of Solar Process Heat Collector Industry in late 2013. In the meantime, the company´s website has also been taken offline.
 

Hawaii: Results of Three Years of Solar Obligation

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 3, 2013

Since Act 204 “mandating” solar water heating systems on all new single-family dwellings came into force in January 2010, the number of new residential houses equipped with a solar water heater has risen to 75 % in Hawaii. This is the conclusion from the statistics published by Hawaiian distributor Inter-Island Solar Supply (IISS). Before the mandate, only 40 % of the new residential homes in Hawaii had solar water heaters, estimates Ron Richmond. The Business Development Manager of IISS and former member of the Board of the Hawaii Solar Energy Association (HSEA), however, thinks that there is still room for improvement: The new houses require no independent third-party inspection, because homeowners do not receive any funding from local utilities.
Source: IISS gathering official data

Database of Building Codes: 24 Individual Regulations

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 25, 2013

Sometimes, it takes a while until good ideas are copied. This has been the case with solar/renewable building codes, which were invented in Israel more than 30 years ago. It has just been over the last ten years, however, that this political instrument reached all five continents. Frontrunner in Europe was Spain, which approved the Technical Building Code, CTE, in March 2006. It stipulates that new residential buildings and those undergoing major renovation must cover 30 to 70 % of their hot water demand by renewable energies. Outside Europe, it was the Australian state of Victoria which, in 2005, implemented the first building standard after Israel had done so two decades earlier. Israel’s building code lets private homeowners choose between two options - a solar water heater or a rainwater tank - in case of newly built houses and major renovations. In the meantime, the database of solar obligations on solarthermalworld.org has grown further and now includes 24 countries which use one of the various types of solar or renewable building codes. You will find the database by filtering on --> policy --> obligation.
Source: solrico

USA: Utility Networking for Solar Thermal Energy

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 16, 2011

 Logo USH2O” A unique network promoting solar thermal energy has developed in the USA: The Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative (USH2O) launched in 1994 offers utilities, as well as companies related to the solar thermal sector, the opportunity of concerted advocacy initiatives, and exchanging knowledge and experiences. The aim of USH2O is to facilitate the successful implementation of utility solar water heating programmes and educate stakeholders about the potential of solar heating and cooling technologies.

Hawaii: Is the Strongest Solar Thermal Market in the US in Trouble?

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 20, 2011

After being the strongest U.S. market for solar thermal for many years, Hawaii currently has to cope with a falling demand for solar thermal installations. According to the U.S. Solar Market Insight report for the third quarter of US Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) and GMT Research, Hawaii has dropped behind California on second position. Solarthermalworld.org asked Mark Duda, President of the Hawaiian Solar Energy Association, about the background of this development.

USA: 100th Anniversary of modern Solar Thermal Heater

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 19, 2010

 William J. Bailey” Pioneering solar water heater technology in California: William J. Bailey, a clever business man from California, started producing solar water heaters in his company Day and Night Solar Heater Co. exactly 100 years ago. The technology was based on Bailey´s own patent, which was approved on 2 August 1910.
Photo: A Golden Thread*

Hawaii: Mixed Results six Month after the Solar Mandate came into Effect

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 23, 2010

 hawaii landscape” Every fifth building permit for new single-family houses in Hawaii included a tankless gas water heater in the first half of 2010. This is a rather large share, if considered that Hawaii has “mandated” solar thermal water heaters since the beginning of 2010.
Photo: www.kleinezeitung.at

Hawaii Tax Information Release (2007)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 3, 2010

This document produced by the Taxation Department of the State of Hawaii explains the renewable energy technologies income tax credit, which was put in place in by the authorities in Hawaii. This incentive scheme covers solar thermal energy, wind as well as photovoltaics.
The document goes through possible questions and doubts related to this tax credit, like who can claim the credit and when, which systems are qualified and which kind of buildings these systems can be used on.

Hawaii: Electricity through Sunshine and MicroCSP Technology

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 24, 2010

 1,000 parabolic trough collectors” A solar field for electricity production: The 1,000 parabolic trough collectors by Hawaiian manufacturer Sopogy, which stand in the hot Kona desert on the Big Island of Hawaii, equal the output of a 2 MW thermal power.
Photo: Sopogy/Keahole Solar Power

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