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Norway

IEA SHC: Task 56 Kick-Off Meeting on Building Integrated Solar

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 30, 2016
Norway AventaAlmost 30 experts from 25 partner organisations met in Bolzano, Italy, on 21 and 22 March for the kick-off meeting of IEA SHC Task 56, Building Integrated Solar Envelope Systems for HVAC and Lighting. The overall goal of the task is to find out “why some ways of solar integration do work, while others don’t,” as the Task Operating Agent and Coordinator of the Sustainable Heating and Cooling Systems research team at Italian institute EURAC, Roberto Fedrizzi, put it – and, of course, to find measures to improve solar technology integration into façades and roofs. The photo shows a residential home in Stavern, southern Norway, where 7 m2 of solar collectors have been integrated into window frames in the south-facing facade, contributing to both domestic hot water preparation and space heating.
Photo: Aventa

Bulgaria: Prisoners Make Solar Water Heaters in Sofia

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 29, 2016
Bulgaria prison productionWhen it comes to renewable energies policy, Bulgaria is certainly not the most progressive country in Europe. So what GE Prisons Production (GE PP) did was an even more notable endeavour: The government-owned company established a so-called Green Plant on the premises of the Sofia Central Prison to manufacture solar water heaters. “I believe that the utilisation of solar energy is the future,” Yavor Dimitrov, Production Manager at GE PP said. “With many sunny days, climatic conditions in Bulgaria are favourable for this type of energy, which is why we decided to launch a production unit for solar thermal energy systems.” Before the solar business, GE PP had already been operating various production plants for window frames, furniture and clothing across the country. The photo shows a factory in Sofia for the manufacture of heat transfer coils, including two of the workers employed there.
Photo: GE PP 

Residential Support Programme in Norway

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 20, 2015

In January 2015, the Norwegian energy agency ENOVA improved the national subsidy scheme that grants energy efficiency technologies as well as renewable energies in the residential sector since 2008. Since 2015 the applicant has a legal right for the funding“ if the household fulfills all eligible criteria. This is called “rettighetsbasert” in Norwegian, which could be translated to „rights-based“. Households enjoy a financial support of 25 % of the documented total expenses (including VAT).

Effective Date: 
Thursday, January 1, 2015

Austria: One World Solar Collector Receives Solar Keymark

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 20, 2015
SunlumoThe One World Solar Collector developed by Austrian company Sunlumo finally received a Solar Keymark certificate in October 2015 (see the attached PDF). This is a milestone in the long design and development process, which started in 2009. “We designed a completely new collector model optimising weight, performance, logistics and raw materials,” Robert Buchinger (left), Managing Director of Sunlumo, says about the long term R&D project. The photo, which was taken at machinery supplier Fill’s booth at the 2014 edition of Fakuma, the international trade fair for plastics processing, in Germany, shows Buchinger and Wilhelm Rupertsberger, Head of Competence Center Polymer Technology at FilI, holding up the pilot collector with a gross collector area of 0.95 m² and a weight of only 8.1 kg. Sunlumo is looking for investors who want to purchase a complete production line as well as the license and produce the polymer collector locally. The One World Solar Collector is the third 100 % polymer collector with a Solar Keymark certificate. The other two are Eco Flare 3M by Israeli manufacturer Magen Eco Energy and a collector from Norway’s Aventa. 
Photo: Sunlumo
 

IEA SHC Task 51: Urban Planners Know Little about Solar Energy Potential

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 3, 2015
IEA SHC Task 51During IEA SHC Task 51, Solar Energy in Urban Planning, the project partners evaluated the legal, process and education issues of solar in urban planning across the twelve member countries. What they found was: Planners and architects know little about the opportunities of solar energy usage. Solar energy in urban planning is also rarely a topic during university courses for architects or urban planners. The photo shows participants of the latest Task 51 meeting visiting a big PV installation. The meeting was held on the French island of Réunion from 28 September to 2 October. The task is about all types of solar energy. 
Photo: Maria Wall
 

Solar Days 2015: Individual Schedules in Eight Countries

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 31, 2015
LuftballonsThe European Solar Days (ESD) seem to have lost some momentum. Since the European Union stopped co-financing the ESD, it seems that several national partners among the so far more than 20 participating countries have found it harder to get monetary support for their work and all of the activities required for coordinating the Solar Days campaign at national level. Still, the European Solar Thermal Industry Federation (ESTIF) has been able to agree with several previously participating countries on a common schedule from 1 to 15 May. Austria, Switzerland, Norway, Poland and Serbia have already told ESTIF about their activities in May (see the table below). Belgium, Denmark, Slovenia and Spain, however, will not offer any solar days this year. The photo shows an event in an primary school in Switzerland
Photo: Scuola Elementare Canobbio
 

New Report: Lessons Learned from 20 Non-Residential Building Renovations

Submitted by Pam Murphy on May 14, 2015

Buildings are responsible for up to 35 % of the total energy consumption in many  IEA countries. Exemplary non-residential renovation projects are showing that total primary energy consumption can be drastically reduced together with improvements of the indoor climate.  This IEA SHC report highlights 20 of these renovation projects. The projects are also described in detail in a series of eight-page brochures available for download from http://task47.iea-shc.org/publications.

Authors: Fritjof Salvesen and Mari Lyseid Authen

Solar Energy complements Building Architecture (2014)

Submitted by Pam Murphy on December 5, 2014

A free IEA SHC online database of 50 projects from 11 countries highlights how active and passive solar can decrease energy demand and enhance a building's architectural quality 

Author: Maria Wall

Europe: Online Database on Large-Scale Solar Heating Plants

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 18, 2014
District Heating per CountryThe database on Europe’s largest solar heating plants, which can be found on the EU project SDHplus website, dates back to 1997. In the meantime, it has grown to 131 solar heating plants totalling a collector area of 586,000 m² (410 MWth). The first plants included in the database were installed in 1979. 124 of 131 systems are solar heating plants, most of them for district heating (particularly those in Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Austria, Poland and France), but also for large buildings, industrial use and other applications, whereas seven are cooling installations. The database contains "close to 100 % of all plants which have a minimum thermal output of 700 kW and started operating until the end of 2013,” says Jan-Olof Dalenbäck from the Chalmers University of Technology, who is in charge of updating the database as part of the SDHplus project. Eleven of these systems, with a joint output of 22 MW, have been shut down by now. The pie chart shows the installed collector area of district heating systems broken down by country.
Source: Database on SDHplus website
 

Norway: Research Community Visits Estate Built with Polymer Collectors

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 2, 2014
StenbratliaNorwegian collector manufacturer Aventa and the University of Oslo’s Department of Physics jointly hosted two meetings in the middle of October: The meeting of Task 39 (Polymeric Materials for Solar Thermal Applications) of the International Energy Agency’s Solar Heating and Cooling programme (IEA SHC), as well as the meeting of the EU’s SCOOP (Solar Collectors made Of Polymers) project. Both research programmes focus on the use of polymeric materials in solar thermal applications and are headed by Michael Köhl, researcher at the German Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Fraunhofer ISE. The photo shows the attendants of the research meeting while they were visiting Stenbråtlia: Architect Hans Dahl (middle), Prof John Rekstad, CEO of Aventa (far left) and Dr Michaela Meir, Head of R&D at Aventa (far right). Stenbråtlia consists of 34 terraced houses built according to the so-called passive house standard and equipped with roof-integrated polymer collectors from Aventa.
Photo: Aventa
 

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