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An Overview of CSP in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East (2008)

Submitted by Hans Craen on May 6, 2009

This document from 2008 gives a comprehensive overview of CSP development in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The paper first looks into the key drivers and key inhibitors that impact the growth of CSP. Particular attention is given to the cost factor of CSP such as initial investment costs and the operating & maintenance costs.

Barriers to Technology Diffusion: the Case of Solar Thermal Technologies (2006)

Submitted by Hans Craen on March 27, 2009

This joint paper from the OECD and IEA (October 2006) looks into the different barriers that exist which prevent solar thermal technologies to deliver its real potential. Next to listing the barriers, the document also looks into means to overcome these, the existing technologies & markets and identifies best practices which can be used by policy makers in both industrialised and developing countries.

Three barriers to diffusion are analysed in more detail:

(1) Technical barriers,

(2) Economic barriers and

Solar Cooling Kits for Europe

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 5, 2009

Solar Cooling in MaltaSolar cooling for an office building in Kordin, Malta: The Chillii Solar Cooling Kit PSC10 uses 30.5 m² flat plate and 7 m² of vacuum tube collectors to generate 10 kW of cold in an ammonia/water absorption chiller. Photo: Solarnext


Energy Directive Adopted by European Parliament

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 5, 2009

It's a great step forward acknowledging solar heating and cooling to be a key factor for climate protection: For the first time, heating and cooling is covered by an European Directive. The new Energy Directive was adopted with 634 votes in favour and only 25 against and 25 absent in the European Parliament at the 17th December 2008.

Olivier Drücke: New ESTIF President

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 21, 2008

ESTIF president Olivier DrueckeOlivier Drücke has been working in the solar thermal sector since 1990 and is head of sales and marketing at the KBB Kollektorbau GmbH, a Berlin-based collector manufacturer, since September 2005. Photo: ESTIF

Solar Heat Used Rarely in Industrial Processes

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 14, 2008

If solar heat likes to gain more importance in the future, it should not ignore the industrial sector. Task 33 of the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Solar Heating & Cooling programme performed an analysis of industrial energy needs and looked for the potential of solar heat within the sector. The Task’s scientists found a huge potential for energy from the sun. The industrial sector makes up about 28 % of total primary energy consumption in the European Union. A significant share of the heat used in industrial processes is used at low or medium temperatures.

Mature European Market: More than € 2 billion and More than 30,000 Jobs

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 23, 2008

The solar thermal market in Europe is by far a mature sector with a substantial total turnover of more than € 2 billion and more than 30,000 jobs. This is shown by the Solar thermal barometer published in October by the French-based organization Observ´ER. These figures result from some simple assumptions.

Front-runners of solar district heating

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 5, 2008

Solar Thermal District Heating
Feeding directly into the district heating system of the Austrian city of Graz: The collector fields are mounted on four different hall roofs belonging to the AEVG, a municipal waste disposal company.

Photo: S.O.L.I.D. / Oberländer

Process Heat: the Solar Thermal Challenge of the Future

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 15, 2008

So far solar thermal technology is mostly used for domestic hot water, pool heating and room heating. It´s often forgotten that there is a huge demand for heat below 250 °C in industry, which can easily be reached with solar thermal collectors.

An international team of researchers working on behalf of the International Energy Agency estimated the realisable potential of solar process heat in the European Union at 100 GWth, which corresponds to 140 million m2 of collector area. T

Today, however, a solar thermal capacity of only 13.5 GWth is in operation across Europe. Task 33 of the International Energy Agency reported 85 solar process heat plants worldwide with a capacity of 27 MWth. However, this market segment seems to be waking up. Just recently, news about huge solar process heat installations did the rounds. There is the 13,000 m2 plant in Hangzhou, China, on the roof of the textile dyeing factory Daly Ltd., which is most probably the biggest installation for solar process heat in the world. The total investment adds up to RMB 12 million (€ 1.11 million) including the tanks and mounting system. According to the project developer, the Chinese company Shenzhen Quir Solar Technology Co., Ltd, the solar collectors will save RMB 3.38 million (€ 0.31 million) per year, so that the investment will pay off within 3 years. The hot water is provided at a low temperature of 55 °C. Secondly, this summer the German brewery Hofmühl GmbH in Eichstätt will start operating a pilot plant with 1,389 m2 of vacuum tube collectors, which will supply process heat between 90 and 140 °C to the brewing and cleaning processes. The owner of the system estimates a reduction of 20 % in the annual energy demand of the factory. The company is convinced that the investment will pay off and has plans for subsequent upsizing to 3,000 m2. The project is being subsidised by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety.

What are the main topics for the future to open this new market sector?

What are the advantages of solar thermal water heating systems at a personal level?

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 9, 2008

Most importantly: The energy of the sun is endless, sufficient and free of charge. Using solar water heating technology makes you independent of the rapidly increasing fossil fuel prices. It saves customers energy, money, is clean and safe and it is a long-living technology with life cycles of 25 years and more.


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