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German Federal Environment Ministry

Solar Payback: Three-year Support Project for Solar Process Heat Launched in India

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 8, 2017
Solar Payback GroupThe Solar Thermal Federation of India (STFI) and the Indo-German Chamber of Commerce (IGCC) have teamed up for the international Solar Payback project, which aims to increase the use of solar thermal energy in industrial processes. The photo shows the partners during the Kick-Off Meeting in Mumbai, India, on 16 December 2016. Supported by the German Federal Environment Ministry funded by the International Climate Initiative, the three-year project will be implemented in India, South Africa, Mexico and Brazil. It is coordinated by the German Solar Association BSW-Solar and eleven partner organisations: three German companies, plus each target country’s national solar industry association and German chamber of commerce. 
Photo: STFI
 

Construction of Solar Collectors for Warm Water – Practical Guide (2014)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on March 5, 2015

WECF,  Women of Europe for a Common Future, has published a practical guide explaining how to build a cheap and efficient solar water heating system, using local knowledge and materials and which can be used all year long. The document provides information on the different parts of a solar water heater, on how to build solar collectors and a heat exchanger tank.  It also gives further information on other solar water heater models.

Germany: Additional Support for Small Solar Cooling Systems

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 3, 2014
Since January 2014, companies have been able to receive grants for their thermal-driven sorption cooling systems with a cooling power between 5 kW and 500 kW from the programme for commercial cooling technology in Germany. Until 2013, the minimum cooling power for the programme had been 50 kW. The Federal Environment Ministry published the amendment on 16 December 2013 (see the attached document). The programme supports solar thermal cooling, but also cooling systems driven by other green heat sources, such as industrial waste heat, cogeneration plants and district heating. The subsidy is 25% of the net investment for the cooling system, including installation and consulting costs. 
Source: Green Chiller

Global Collector Test Standard Incorporates New Technologies

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 24, 2013

The final version of the EN ISO 9806 was approved by the international standard committees CEN/TC 312 and ISO TC180 with more than 90 % of the votes shortly before their meetings in Freiburg, Germany, in the middle of September. This is an important milestone for the solar thermal industry, because it marks the first time that there will be a modern global standard for collector testing procedures which different countries can refer to. In addition, the new standard includes testing methodology for a number of new solar thermal technologies, such as solar air heating collectors, concentrating medium-temperature collectors and PVT collectors. Now, it will only be a matter of weeks until the standard is handed down to the national standardisation secretariats and, over the coming month, distributed through their national publication channels.
Photo: Solarwall

Germany: Renewable Heating Law Pushes Solar Thermal in New Buildings

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 19, 2013

With almost one year of delay, the German government finally published the mandatory evaluation on the effects of the Renewable Energies Heating Law (EEWärmeG) in December 2012. The German ministries involved had a hard time to agree on whether the existing measures are enough to fulfil the 2020 target of 14% renewable heat or whether stricter laws and higher financial incentives would be necessary. The final report is a compromise which seems to have no clear goal: On the one hand, it states that there is no need for short-term changes. On the other hand, it says that the share of renewable heat will only reach 12.2 % by 2020. The chart shows that heat pumps profited much more from the EEWärmeG than solar thermal technologies.
Data Source: German Federal Environment Ministry

Costa Rica: Training Course at Earth University

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 4, 2012

An excellent campus, a highly motivated group of professionals and an abundantly sunny country: Martin Schnauss (third from right) is very satisfied with his Costa Rican training course, which took place in the middle of November at the international campus of the Earth University, a two-hour drive from the country’s capital, San José. Together with his colleague Katie Brown, Schnauss held the one-week training course about solar heating and cooling technology in cooperation with the German Renewables Academy AG (RENAC). The course, which was financed by the German Federal Environment Ministry, BMU, was free of charge for the participants.
Photos: RENAC AG

Germany: No Upturn in 2012

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 3, 2012

Despite a good start, 2012 has not seen any upturn in the German solar thermal industry, as latest figures show. Carsten Kuhlmann (in the middle) from the heating manufacturers association BDH expects a newly installed collector area of 1.2 million m², which would be 5 % less than in 2011. The number was part of Kuhlmann’s presentation at the Forum Solarpraxis, a conference in Berlin, Germany, at which scientists, associations and industry representatives discussed the future of solar heating and cooling at the end of November. The photo shows the German renewable energy journalist Dr. Detlef Koenemann (left) and moderator of the session and Jörg Mayer, Managing Director of the German solar industry association BSW Solar.
Photo: Solarpraxis

Germany: Environment Ministry Pushes up Solar Process Heat Subsidies

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on August 16, 2012

The Federal Environment Ministry has approved new frame conditions for the MAP, the national Market Rebate Programme for Renewable Energies. Since 15 August, house owners have been receiving a minimum subsidy of EUR 1,500 for a solar combi system, which supplies hot water and space heating. The original tariff of 90 EUR/m2 stays in place additionally. The German Environment Minister, Peter Altmaier (see photo), has also reinforced the state’s commitment to process heat: Clients can now receive a subsidy of 50 % of the net investment costs under the MAP programme. So far, the only measure to cover part of the investment costs (30%) had been a low-interest loan by the German KfW banking group.
Photo: German Environment Ministry

Germany: BSW Solar Presents Solar Heat Roadmap - Finally

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on July 10, 2012

 Total installed solar thermal capacity in Germany by 2030” With half a year delay, the German solar industry association Bundesverband Solarwirtschaft (BSW Solar) officially presented its Roadmap for Solar Heat at the Intersolar Europe in June 2012. The roadmap describes scenarios to develop solar thermal in Germany and shows the policies needed to implement them. While the roadmap’s outlook is being criticised for sounding too optimistic, one of the authors, Matthias Reitzenstein, emphasises that the paper is not meant to be a prediction of what will happen but rather a guide about what needs to be done.
Chart: Roadmap of Solar Heat, BSW Solar

Germany: Association and Ministry Discuss Market Development

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 28, 2012

 BDH Market Segmentation The symposium “Solar Thermal Energy” - the largest German-speaking conference dedicated to solar heating and cooling technology – has painted a mixed picture of the current development in Germany. The 3-day event, which was organised by German company Otti and took place at the beginning of May, gathered 430 researchers and industry representatives from Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The keynote speakers from the German Federal Environment Ministry, as well as from the national and international associations devoted most of their presentation time to analysing the German market. Their 2012 forecast: A 10 % plus, resulting in a newly installed solar thermal capacity of 980 MWth (1.4 million m²). The chart depicts the potential share of different heating systems combined with solar in 2012.
Source: BDH

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