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Solar Cooling

SDH prefeasibility studies in Bosnia and Croatia

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 29, 2018
Source: CoolHeatingIn early 2016, EU-funded CoolHeating began using the know-how acquired during best practice projects in Austria, Denmark and Germany to help with the implementation of small modular renewable heating and cooling grids in southeastern Europe. In mid-March, the CoolHeating partners published seven prefeasibility studies of district heating and cooling across five municipalities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Serbia and Slovenia. Because of geographical features, most projects favoured biomass, but solar thermal does play a crucial role in the proposals created for the Bosnian town of Visoko (see map) and the Croatian city of Ozalj. 
Source: CoolHeating

Solar steam for process heat and air conditioning

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 18, 2018
Photo: Industrial SolarGerman Fresnel collector manufacturer Industrial Solar has completed its second industrial solar heat installation in Jordan. Three years after it had put into operation a Fresnel field at pharmaceuticals company Ram Pharma, a 700 kW concentrating collector system came online at tobacco manufacturer Japan Tobacco International, also known as JTI, in late 2017. The solar steam that the new system produces is used in two ways. It is injected into the steam grid to supply process heat to manufacturing and it powers a new installed double-effect absorption chiller to provide on-site buildings with air conditioning. JTI regards the solar steam unit as a strategic investment to demonstrate its commitment to establishing sustainable supply chains and, especially, to reducing the carbon footprint of its global operations.
Photo: Industrial Solar

Solar cooling demand on the rise in Italy, Spain and the Middle East

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 27, 2018
Photo: TVPSorption chillers may still be a niche market, but Europe’s manufacturers reported rising demand for solar thermal cooling in Italy, Spain and the Middle East in 2017. Solar thermal numbers are on the rise because of three factors: the potential to reduce power consumption, including peak loads; the option to use natural refrigerants, such as water; and the ability to provide demand-responsive heating and cooling throughout the year. The photo shows the solar-cooled headquarters of Agility, a logistics business based in Kuwait. The 234 m² of evacuated flat plate collectors which provide the building with energy can be seen behind it. 
Photo: TVP

German associations partner up to promote sustainable cooling

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 27, 2018
Logos solar coolingIn early 2018, two German organisations agreed on a joint membership model to promote solar thermal air conditioning and cooling, a niche market in the country. The cooperation between the Green Chiller Association for Sorption Cooling and the Central Association for Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps, or ZVKKW for short, is hoped to popularise innovative and sustainable cooling solutions. According to a survey among members of the Green Chiller Association, some companies have shifted away from solar-powered sorption cooling because they consider systems combining solar PV and split air conditioning units to have greater economic benefits, especially if the cooling season is short. Others are increasingly using waste heat to run sorption chillers. 

First cooling installation on Indian government building

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 10, 2018
Photo: VSM SolarGujarat State Electricity Corporation set up a solar thermal air conditioning system as part of its clean energy initiative last August. The installation offers a capacity of 150 tons of refrigeration (528 kW) to cool the Gandhinagar Thermal Power Station’s office building in Gujarat state in western India. The total investment, including the collector field, mounting equipment, chiller and hot water storage tanks, amounted to Indian Rupee (INR) 52 million, or around EUR 0.7 million, which corresponds to specific costs of 1,327 EUR/kW. 
Photo: VSM Solar

Financial support for concentrating solar systems extended until 2020

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 14, 2018
Photo: HoneywellThe “order” published by the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy on 26 February 2018 put an end to the uncertainty which had pervaded the industry. In the 2-page document, the ministry pledged to continue its investment subsidy programme for concentrating solar thermal systems. The target until March 2020 is 90,000 m² of collector area. The financial year 2017 to 2018, during which 20,000 m² were planned to be subsidised, is almost over.
Photo: Honeywell
 

Solar cooling increases annual solar fraction

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 24, 2018
Task 53 1Solar cooling could be an effective way to increase the annual solar fraction of domestic hot water production and prevent the solar system from overheating in summer. Under the aegis of the IEA Solar Heating & Cooling Programme, researchers from Task 53, New Generation Solar Cooling & Heating Systems, have written a new book, titled The Solar Cooling Design Guide: Case Studies of Successful Solar Air Conditioning Design. It includes a detailed case study of two buildings containing offices and flats in Montpellier, France. The on-site 240 m² flat plate collector system powers a 35-kW absorption chiller to achieve a 70 % solar fraction in annual hot water production (see photo). Between November and March, the system continues to provide around 40 % of the heating energy to meet hot water demand.
Photo: Tecsol/Serm
 

IKEA stores begin to switch over to solar heating and cooling

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 13, 2018
Ikea SingaporeIKEA, one of the world´s biggest home furnishing retailers, has demonstrated a strong, long-term commitment to climate protection. By 2020, the company intends to generate as much energy from renewables as it consumes in day-to-day operations. While most of the electricity is now generated from renewable sources, IKEA’s store managers have not lost sight of the heating part of the equation. Two locations, one in Singapore (see photo) and one in the Russian Omsk region, have recently announced the completion of new solar heating and cooling installations.
Photo: S.O.L.I.D.
 

How to approach green construction in the tropical zone

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 11, 2017
Dr Gao BCA SingaporeWhile nearly zero energy projects in Europe focus on reducing heat demand, green buildings in tropical Singapore require lower cooling loads. To study and discuss methods to meet cooling needs, construction and energy experts from all around the world met in Singapore in late October for a two-day workshop organised by the Building & Construction Authority Singapore (BCA) and the IEA’s Buildings and Communities Programme (EBC). The aim of the Future Buildings Forum (FBF) 2017 was an agreement on strategic R&D priorities for Transforming Cities in Hot and Humid Climates Towards More Efficient and Sustainable Energy Use.
Photo: BCA
 

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