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SHC IEA’s Task 53

Solar cooling increases annual solar fraction

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 24, 2018
Task 53 1Solar cooling could be an effective way to increase the annual solar fraction of domestic hot water production and prevent the solar system from overheating in summer. Under the aegis of the IEA Solar Heating & Cooling Programme, researchers from Task 53, New Generation Solar Cooling & Heating Systems, have written a new book, titled The Solar Cooling Design Guide: Case Studies of Successful Solar Air Conditioning Design. It includes a detailed case study of two buildings containing offices and flats in Montpellier, France. The on-site 240 m² flat plate collector system powers a 35-kW absorption chiller to achieve a 70 % solar fraction in annual hot water production (see photo). Between November and March, the system continues to provide around 40 % of the heating energy to meet hot water demand.
Photo: Tecsol/Serm

Solar Cooling 2.0: New Generation Growing Up

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 1, 2015
Task 53The workshop New Generation Solar Cooling & Heating Systems held in Rome, Italy, on 23 September 2015 was the opportunity to check the status of both research on and market developments in solar cooling technology. The half-day event, which had about 40 participants, was jointly organised by Task 53 of the IEA Solar Heating & Cooling Programme and the German Eastbavarian Institute for Technology Transfer, OTTI e.V., and took place a day before the start of OTTI’s 6th International Conference on Solar Air-Conditioning. Above all, the workshop provided a platform for presenting the first outcomes of the international research cooperation TASK 53 entitled New Generation Solar Cooling & Heating Systems, which was launched in March 2014, will end in 2017 and involves 10 countries, some from outside Europe (see the attached introductory presentation). 

Solar Cooling Week in China: Sector Still Growing in Asia and Europe

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on April 30, 2015
Solar Cooling WeekSolar thermal cooling is a “small, but steadily growing market,” Dr Uli Jakob from the Green Chiller Association for Sorption Cooling pointed out in his presentation Solar Air-Conditioning in Europe during the Solar Cooling Week, which took place in Shanghai from 23 to 27 March. The week started with two experts meetings of IEA SHC Task 48 (Quality Assurance and Support Measures for Solar Cooling Systems) and Task 53 (New Generation Solar Cooling and Heating Systems) on solar cooling and ended with the Solar Cooling Conference. About 80 % of the over 100 participants came from Asian countries. Conference Chairman Daniel Mugnier (see photo) thanked “Shanghai Jiao Tong University – and especially, Professor Yajun Dai  for having organised “a perfect Solar Cooling Week.” 
Photo: dr. jakob energy research

China: First Chinese Solar Cooling Conference to Take Place in Shanghai in March

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 5, 2015
SHC ConferenceThis spring, a major event for solar cooling is going to take place in Shanghai: From 23 to 27 March 2015, the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) will jointly organise a Solar Cooling Week in the city. The week is going to start off with two Task meetings and end with the two-day Solar Cooling Conference (SCC). The SCC will take place for the very first time, be open to the public and include technical site visits on 26 March 2015, as well as a full-day conference with plenary and parallel sessions on 27 March 2015.

Sweden: Novel Solar Cooling Installation Boasts Average Electrical COP of 10.6

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on October 28, 2014
ConferenceThe first large-scale system which incorporates the newly developed CoolStore chiller by Swedish company ClimateWell was commissioned in June 2014 and has since been operating flawlessly at Swedish coffee producer Löfbergs in Karlstad, Sweden. In the middle of October, ClimateWell organised a mini-conference at Löfbergs in order to showcase the installation and its first monitoring results. The measurements taken between 11 and 25 July showed an average electrical coefficient of performance (COPel) of 10.6. This is more than twice as much as for a conventional electric vapour compression system, which has a COPel of between 2 and 5. The highest COP measured at the demonstration plant was 12.
Photos: ClimateWell

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