Switzerland: New Buildings to Reach Nearly Zero Energy Standard by 2020

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 24, 2015
Swissolar TrogenOn 9 January 2015, the Swiss Conference of Cantonal Energy Directors agreed on nationwide model rules for building energy codes. These rules include a nearly zero energy standard for new buildings from 2020 onwards and a 10 % renewable requirement for heating system retrofits. Although Switzerland is not a member of the European Union, the country’s energy standards are similar to what the European Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (2010/31/EU) requires from member states. 
Photo: Swissolar
 

Novel Solar Thermal Polygeneration System for Sustainable Production of Cooling, Clean Water and Domestic Hot Water in UAE (2014)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on January 23, 2015

This master thesis, written by Gowtham Mohan at the Stockholm KTH School of Industrial Engineering and Management, introduces a solar thermal poly-generation (STP) system for production of chilled water for air conditioning using absorption chiller, pure water with membrane distillation and domestic hot water by heat recovery.

Uruguay: New Regulations for Solar Housing Projects

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 23, 2015
Uruguay regulatiosUruguay took the next step towards a sunny future for the country. With the approval of the new regulation for the promotion of social housing projects, which entered into force on 16 June 2014, the Uruguayan Ministry of Housing, Land Use Planning and Environment, MVOTMA, stipulated that private investors in social housing projects can only receive the tax credits offered in law no. 18.795 from August 2011 if they install pipes and structures required for setting up a solar water heater later. Since June, solar thermal systems and their pre-installation requirements have received much more attention from architects, and solar thermal specialists see increasing demand for their engineering and design solutions. 
 

Contracting Models for Solar Thermally Driven Cooling and Heating Systems (2014)

Submitted by Pam Murphy on January 19, 2015
This report highlights new perspectives of financing large solar thermal cooling projects with the objective to expand the use of solar cooling technologies in the public and private sectors through an improved understanding of the approaches adopted by contracting models. The work was supported by the SHC project on large scale solar heating and cooling systems (SHC Task 45).

Authors: Moritz, Schubert, Sabine Putz

Date: 18 September 2014

Pages: 34

Spain: Andalusia Incentives Continue Until June 2015

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 18, 2015
AndalusiaThe good results achieved by the Andalusian solar thermal incentive scheme, Prosol, have encouraged the regional government to extend the programme, but only until June 2015. Prosol subsidies cover up to 40 % of the investment costs in new solar thermal systems. The Andalusian market contributed roughly one-third to the entire newly installed capacity in Spain in 2014.
Source: Energy Agency of Andalusia and own calculations
 

Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Status and Perspectives (2014)

Submitted by Francesco Gattiglio on January 15, 2015

This presentation, made by Prof. Paul Kohlenbach of the Beuth University of Applied Sciences of Berlin, illustrates the status and perspectives of solar thermal heating and cooling of buildings in Germany. The presentation was made at the Mexican-German Chamber of Commerce on September 2014.  

Solar Water Heating Techscop Market Readiness Report (2014)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on January 12, 2015

In support of the Global Solar Water Heating (GSWH) Market Transformation and Strengthening Initiative (“the GSWH project”), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has identified a need for a replicable and public methodology to evaluate the solar water heating policy, finance and investment, business, and quality control infrastructure across countries: the SWH TechScope Market Readiness Assessment methodology.

Bulgaria: New Solar Thermal Market Data Published

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 12, 2015
It is crucial for stakeholders – no matter in which markets they operate – to obtain accurate statistical data before making investment decisions. Sometimes, however, this is not an easy task; an example of how difficult it is to rely on published statistics is the Bulgarian market for solar thermal energy. The June 2014 market report (336 downloads | 7.26 MB) by the European Solar Thermal Industry Federation (ESTIF) showed the newly installed collector area in Bulgaria in 2013 to add up to 5,600 m². But the country’s leading flat plate collector manufacturer, NES New Energy Systems, located in the town of Shumen in northeast Bulgaria, reported an annual production volume of 20,000 m² for 2013 and sales of 12,000 m² during the same year. This means that the NES collectors alone (assuming that they were installed) would double the market volume which was published in the ESTIF report. In an attempt to find an explanation for the diverging figures, solarthermalworld.org contacted the available sources.
 

Jordan: “The solar bylaw is not going to have a strong impact on the market”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 6, 2015
Millennium Solar EnergySince April 2013, Jordan has had a solar bylaw in place. The rules of the bylaw were stipulated in Article 10 of Law No. 73, which had already entered into force in 2012. Solar water heaters are a mandatory requirement for every new multi-family building with more than 150 m² of living space, for every new office building exceeding 100 m² of floor space, as well as each new public building with more than 250 m². There are, however, no additional regulations regarding quality standards or system sizes. Solarthermalworld.org spoke with Angelika Cerny, International Sales Coordinator at Jordan-based solar thermal turnkey-solution provider Millennium Energy Industries (MEI), about the effectiveness of the bylaw and the market development in Jordan. The photo shows an 80 m2 vacuum tube collector field which was set up in 2013 as a pergola for the office building of Jordan company EDGO Ventures in Amman. 
Photo: Millennium Solar Energy
 

Bylaw in Jordan

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on January 6, 2015
In 2012, the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources along with the National Energy Research Center in Jordan approved a solar bylaw which entered into force in April 2013 (see the attached document). According to Article 10 of Law No. 73, solar water heaters are a mandatory requirement for every new multi-family building with more than 150 m² of living space, for every new office building exceeding 100 m² of floor space, as well as each new public building with more than 250 m². The bylaw encourages spreading the national awareness in the field of conservation of energy and improvement of its efficiency and helps establishing a database related to conservation of energy and improvement of its efficiency. There are, however, no additional regulations regarding quality standards or system sizes.

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