Resource/Cost Estimates for Solar Thermal Space/Water Heating 2010 and 2020 ((2004)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 19, 2015

The Solar heat resource is dependent in the first instance on the insolation falling on the surface of Ireland. The usable power generated by solar panels will vary depending on latitude, time of year and weather conditions. According to the European Solar Thermal Industry Federation, current technology produces per square metre of solar panel between 300 and 450 thermal kWh/year. 

Solar Water Heating Systems in Libya (2013)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 18, 2015

This presentation on solar water heating (SWH) systems was given by Dr. Mohamed Erhouma, Head of Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Department at CSERS (Center for Solar Energy Research and Studies) at a workshop on “Promoting Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency in Libya” organized jointly by  REAOL (the Renewable Energy Authority of Libya) and the World Bank.

Local Employment through the Low-Pressure Solar Water Heater Roll-out in South Africa (2013)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 18, 2015

This study has been conducted by the Energy Research Center of the University of Cape Town and aims at demonstrating how developing low-pressure solar water heaters (LP SWH) can have an impact on reducing poverty and inequality and creating employment possibilities in South Africa.

Brazil: Mandatory Certification Postponed to September 2015

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 18, 2015
Certifica SolOriginally, the Brazilian Labelling Program, PBE, was supposed to become mandatory in July 2014. Now, in 2015, the industry is still waiting for the so-called compulsoriedade to become reality. The label has so far only been mandatory for solar water heaters intended for the federal social housing programme Minha Casa Minha Vida (see photo). In January the press department of INMETRO confirmed per email that there was already a new deadline for manufacturers: From September 2015 on, Brazilians may only produce or import collectors and tanks adhering to the technical requirements for quality based on standard ABNT NBR 15747, which is European norm EN 12975-2 adapted to Brazilian climate conditions. INMETRO also confirmed that resellers would still be allowed to buy non-conforming products until March 2016. After that date they could only sell non-conforming products from their own stocks. From March 2017 on, Brazilian developers would no longer be able to buy or install any solar heating system without an INMETRO certificate – assuming that there won’t be any more delays in implementation.
 

India: Statistics to Determine Vacuum Tube Market Share

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 17, 2015
India Market StatisticsFlat plate collectors – India’s dominant solar thermal technology about a decade ago – has lost a significant portion of its market share in recent years. Although the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), the Indian authority responsible for solar heating statistics, has never published an official figure for the market share of vacuum tube collectors in a given year, a June 2013 interview with former MNRE Director Veena Sinha revealed that the share of vacuum tubes in the residential sector was close to 60 % in Financial Year 2012-2013. The 2014 statistics of online portal Solarwhin still show just about the same percentage: Of the 607,751 m² of subsidised collector area in 2014, 61 % were vacuum tube collectors (369,292) and 39 % flat plate collectors (238,459 m²) – see also the attached PDF, which resulted from a query to the online Solarwhin database. The pie chart above shows the Indian states in which most of the collector area was installed in 2014.
Source: Solarwhin
 

Survey of Active Solar Thermal Collectors, Industry and Markets in Canada (2012)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 16, 2015

This report was prepared by the ClearSky Advisors and is a survey of the Canadian solar thermal industry covering the year 2012.

Mexico: 400 Installers Certified under New Labour Competency Standards

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 13, 2015
MexicoThe new labour standards for solar thermal technology installers approved in Mexico in 2014 seem to have borne fruit. According to Daniel García, President of the renewable energy industry association FAMERAC, some 400 installers have so far been certified for the installation of thermosiphon systems under the new measure, which aims to improve the quality and reliability of newly installed solar thermal systems across the country. Another 1,000 installers are expected to gain certification this year. The photo shows a trainee on the roof of the national renewable energy training centre, CENCER, in Mexico City, after he completed the test installation.
Photo: CENCER
 

Applications of UNEP’s Strategy: Engaging Local Bank for Lending (2014)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 13, 2015

During an event organized earlier this year by IRENA, the International Renewable Energy Agency,   Myriem Touhami, Program Manager, at the Energy Unit of UNEP's Division of Technology, Industry and Economic, presented the applications of UNEP’s strategy to engage local bank for lending.

Solar Process Heat in Breweries (2014)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 13, 2015

This presentation was given by AEE INTEC at a SOLTRAIN training in Pretoria, South Africa, in April 2014.  It provides an overview of the EU-funded FP7 project SolarBrew.  This project aims at developing the use of solar process heat in the brewing industry. 3 breweries are part of this project.  The Brewery Goess in Austria is using solar energy for its mashing process, relying on a 1.500m² flat plate collector field and a 200m³ storage tank.

The Value of Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) in Minnesota: Solar Thermal and Minnesota Energy and Climate Goals (2013).

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on February 13, 2015

This study on the value of solar heating and cooling, commissioned by the Minnesota Department of Commerce, analyses how solar thermal energy can help the state in reaching the climate and energy goals of reducing greenhouse gases emissions by 80% by 2050 and relying on renewable energy to produce 25% of electricity by 2025.

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