Solar obligation by the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 2, 2009

The state of Rio de Janeiro is the front runner in terms of solar building codes on a state level. In January 2008, its state government approved a law that makes the installation of solar water heating systems mandatory for public buildings.

 

Solar Obligation by the Municipality in São Paulo

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 2, 2009

The huge city of São Paulo, with its approx. 19 million inhabitants, approved the first solar obligation on a municipality level in July 2007. Solar water heaters have since become mandatory in a wide range of new residential and non-residential buildings.

IREC – 2006 Annual Report

Submitted by Hans Craen on June 2, 2009

This is a 2006 summary by the US Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). It gives highlights in spending, incentives and rebate programs for solar thermal energy and solar PV systems.

Read document here

 

 

Collective Systems on the Rise in France

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 2, 2009

 collective system in Paris” The segment of collective systems shows high growth rates in France: The main factor behind this growth are the incentives paid by Ademe, the France Energy Agency. The investment for the solar thermal system on top of this multi-storey building in Paris was €353,000 of which 39 % were subsidised by Ademe. Photo: Enerplan

A Solar Field of 7,350 m2 - and a Heat & Power Plant

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on June 1, 2009

 installation of 14 m2 Sunmark collectors” The quickest installation possible: It took only one month to set up the 525 flat plate collectors, each with a 14 m2 surface, in the open countryside. The 7,350 m2 solar thermal system feeds the district heating system of the Danish town of Tørring. Photo: Sunmark

Field Evaluation of an Unglazed, Building-Integrated Solar Domestic Water Heating System

Submitted by Hans Craen on May 28, 2009

This study analyses the performance of roof-integrated, unglazed, solar thermal systems — one for space heating, one for domestic hot water, and a roof-integrated PV system.

This home built the solar systems with aesthetics in mind, and there is no visible evidence of the solar collectors from the outside of the house. Performance of the solar thermal system was monitored by measuring several temperatures and fluid flow rates.

Portugal: Incentive Programme with Obstacles

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 25, 2009

At the moment, the most important factor for the sales success in Portugal is to either be able to join the incentive programme – or to be left out of it. Only seven companies acquired the programme's membership so far (as of mid-May): The three Portuguese brands Norquente, Openplus and Solargus, the Vulcano brand of the German heating giant BBT Thermotechnik, Wikora, which is a German solar thermal system supplier, and Rigsun, a brand from Greece.

Economic Impact of Solar Thermal Electricity Deployment in Spain (2008)

Submitted by Hans Craen on May 25, 2009

This study from 2008 assesses the economic impact of solar thermal electricity in Spain. In particular, the economic analysis is done for three solar thermal technologies: parabolic trough, central tower and parabolic dish. The objective of the conducted study is to estimate the socio-economic impacts coming from the construction of solar thermal power plants in Spain.

Read document here

Source: CIEMAT

Antarctic Polar Station with a German Solar Thermal System

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 23, 2009

 vacuum tubes in Antartic” Producing heat in the cold climate of the Antarctic: The vacuum tube collectors from the German manufacturer Consolar cover the entire heating demand of the first emission-free polar research station, called Princess Elisabeth. Photo: Consolar

Australian RECs: An Overview after 8 Years of Certificate Trading

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 22, 2009

As a purchaser of a solar hot water system in Australia, you not only benefit from a federal or state rebate, but are also able to sell so-called Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs). After these certificates had been introduced in 2001, they became a key factor for the 30% annual growth of the Australian solar thermal market until 2004. The following two years market growth dropped because of the declining value of RECs.

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