New solar energy specialisation master’s programme

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 26, 2018
Photo: Simon Furbo, DTUIn September, the Technical University of Denmark, or DTU for short, launched a specialisation on solar energy as part of its master’s degree programme in Sustainable Energy. Students can choose among eight specialisations, for example, bioenergy, electric energy systems, energy savings, and wind energy. The solar energy specialisation takes two years and is divided into two long semesters of 13 and two short ones of 3 weeks each. Solarthermalworld.org has interviewed Associate Professor Simon Furbo, who leads the DTU Research Group on Solar Heating and was among those who created the new offering.
Photo: Simon Furbo, DTU
 

10,000 m² of solar collectors to help freesias survive the cold

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 25, 2018
Photo: G2EnergyG2Energy, a Dutch-based supplier of turnkey solar thermal systems, has completed one-quarter of a 10,000 m², or 7 MWth, solar field ordered by freesia grower Tesselaar. The system provides heat for greenhouses in Heerhugowaard, Netherlands, and will soon replace all the gas boilers on site. Excess solar heat produced in summer is stored in boreholes underground. Recently, Tesselaar has given the go-ahead for the remaining three-thirds of the EUR 2.5 million solar installation after the first 2,500 m² section had been put to the test and delivered. G2Energy is planning to finish the entire project during the last three months of 2018.
Photo: G2Energy

Support for SDH feasibility studies in Western Balkans

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 21, 2018
Map: oscebih.orgThe European Bank for Reconstruction and Development is now funding feasibility studies under a programme called Renewable District Energy in the Western Balkans, or ReDEWeB for short. Town and city governments, and project developers, can send applications to the bank’s headquarters in London to receive grants for renewable energy systems at either new or existing district heating plants. In the case of ReDEWeB, renewable district energy systems are defined as producing heat or chilled water from solar thermal, biomass, biogas, geothermal, waste heat or heat pumps or the sea, lakes or rivers.
Map: oscebih.org

French SHIP investor partners with technology suppliers

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 19, 2018
Photo: FotoliaKyotherm is making plans to fund its first-ever installation for solar process heat, a system of about 15,000 m² of collector area, or 12 MWth, to supply a malting plant in France with thermal energy. The company is a third-party equity investor focused on financing renewable heat installations and helping commercial clients in the implementation of heat purchase agreements. So far, it has been involved in 17 projects, which dealt with waste heat recovery at a steel factory, geothermal heat at a leisure park near Paris and biomass heat from boilers installed in the UK. 
Photo: Fotolia

Carefree heat supply package plus green marketing

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 18, 2018
Photo: SWANewly founded SWA Solar Wärme Austria is offering solar heat supply to hotels, sports centres, car washes and manufacturing companies. Clients pay individually agreed-on rates, which are up to 20 % lower than current prices and are guaranteed for 20 years. SWA provides a “carefree heat supply package”, with the company financing, installing, operating and monitoring a solar thermal system. According to Managing Director Birgit Rutter, SWA’s first system with 77.5 m² of collector area had come online at a golf club in Klagenfurt-Seltenheim, Austria, a few days ago (see photo). Computer simulations had shown an annual solar yield of 48,000 kWh.
Photo: SWA

New technologies for solar cooling in industry

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 14, 2018
Photo: HyCool ProjectThe aim of just launched HyCool is to present, in the form of two demonstration plants, new solar heating and cooling technologies for industrial use. The combination of state-of-the-art Fresnel collectors by Austrian supplier Fresnex with custom-built hybrid adsorption-compression chillers by German-based Fahrenheit will broaden the temperature range, creating a portfolio of applications to increase the use of solar heating and cooling for industrial processes.
Photo: Fresnex

New at IEA SHC: Solar neighbourhood planning

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 13, 2018
Case study reporting by research platform Solar Energy in Urban Planning has recently concluded with the publication of an interactive map showing 34 case studies altogether. They demonstrate that solar energy can be integrated successfully into new and existing urban areas. The colours on the map classify showcases by the environment in which they are found. Orange denotes existing and blue new urban areas. Green indicates that a solar system has been incorporated into the landscape. A downloadable multi-page flyer is available for each of the sites. As property owners, planners and municipalities still require help with challenging urban solar projects, the IEA’s Solar Heating and Cooling Programme, or IEA SHC, is planning to launch a new research platform titled Solar Neighbourhood Planning
Source: IEA SHC

Solar thermal biomass drying in Chile

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 11, 2018
Grammer SolarGrammer Solar, a German manufacturer of solar air collectors, has signed a contract with Ligno Pellets, a Chilean producer of wood pellets, for the delivery and installation of a 220 m² solar field. Grammer Solar, which opened an office in Chile’s capital, Santiago de Chile, three years ago, has so far built some smaller solar dryers of up to 20 m². The new demonstration plant will be supported by the German Energy Agency, also known as dena. The organisation will reportedly cover 40 % of the investment, which is around EUR 100,000. The photo shows the headquarters of Grammer Solar in Immenstetten, in the south of Germany.
Photo: Grammer Solar

Producing hot water underneath natural slates

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 6, 2018
Castle in Ghent, BelgiumA state-of-the-art solar thermal system has been installed under the slate roof of a castle in Ghent, Belgium. Roll-bonded Thermoslate absorbers measuring 44 m² have been integrated into the space between the wooden trusses and natural slate tiles of the historic structure built in the 12th century and cannot be seen by visitors. The slates are a product by Spanish-based Cupa Pizarras, a member of the Renovating Historic Buildings Towards Zero Carbon research platform created by the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme, or IEA SHC. 
Photo: Spotter 2

New standard to improve energy performance of historic buildings

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 5, 2018
Photo: Trimmel Wall ArchitectsMaintaining the exterior of a historic building while raising energy efficiency is not necessarily a contradiction. The new EN 16883:2017 standard, Conservation of cultural heritage, provides guidance on how to improve the energy performance of historically significant structures. A group made up of 45 experts from 12 countries had mapped out the guidelines for six years before they were published by the European Committee for Standardisation in June 2017. Researchers working for the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme, also known as IEA SHC, are now on the lookout for suitable case studies to evaluate processes and assessments proposed in the standard. The photo shows a convent in Vienna, Austria, which was built in 1904 and renovated in 2013.
Photo: Trimmel Wall Architects 

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